Bitcoin (BTC) Real-Time Price Index and Chart — CoinDesk 20

Ethereum Classic

Ethereum Classic is an open, decentralized, and permissionless public blockchain, that aims to fulfill the original promise of Ethereum, as a platform where smart contracts are free from third-party interference. ETC prioritizes trust-minimization, network security, and integrity. All network upgrades are non-contentious with the aim to fix critical issues or to add value with newly proposed features; never to create new tokens, or to bail out flawed smart contracts and their interest groups.
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[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] Bitcoin Price Index reaches 10K euro!

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The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7hsoe4
The original post's content was as follows:
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submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

(Hyper)inflation

I learned a lot reading about Bitcoin and gold, but i was wondering if there is a guarantee that the US Dollar will collapse in value? If not, what prevents it from not going down? I know it is the reserve currency of the world but printing more USD doesn't automatically mean there will be high numbers of inflation (or perhaps hyperinflation)?
What is the difference in regards to the recent tragic events in Turkey, Libanon, Argentine, Venezuela, etc.? Is it all because of money printing that these currencies lost all of their purchasing power? It looks as if other countries will follow?
I find this very interesting but I still can't see the full big picture. Any good sources to keep learning about all this?
Do you guys believe the Euro and Dollar one day will completely dissapear? If they go to a digital Euro/Dollar .. How will that be different from the cash we are using right now?
Do you think the Euro will get the same faith as the USD? I keep reading about money printing in the USA but I hardly read anything about Europe (I live in Europe btw).
I invested a lot of my money into Bitcoin. It's actually the only asset I currently bought as an investment. I am thinking about buying stocks (particularly index funds) since every money book I read recommends this and i also want to diversify a little for if BTC would fail. Now I'm wondering in which index fund I should invest .. I particularly wonder if America will remain the most powerful capitalist country or if China will take over in the next 50 years .. That's the only thing preventing me from investing in stocks. I don't know what to invest in and especially since now all stocks are so high priced ..
I know this is kind of a ramble but I would love to gain new perspectives from everybody. Thanks for all the insights!
submitted by Brainsick001 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

End of day summary - 09/23

The Dow fell 525.05, or 1.92%, to 26,763.13, the Nasdaq lost 330.65, or 3.02%, to 10,632.98, and the S&P 500 declined 78.65, or 2.37%, to 3,236.92.
The S&P 500 dropped 2.4% on Wednesday in a broad-based retreat that reflected cash-raising efforts. The Nasdaq Composite fell 3.0%, the Russell 2000 fell 3.0%, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 1.9%.
U.S. equity futures were firmer in early trading following an agreement on a continuing resolution to avoid a government shutdown and J&J announcing that it has begun a large phase 3 trial of its COVID-19 vaccine. However, the early gains did not hold and the major averages were all in the red by midday.
All 11 S&P 500 sectors closed sharply lower between 1.1% (health care) and 4.6% (energy), and traditional safe-haven assets did not see the usual appreciation in times of equity weakness.
An initial weakness in the mega-cap stocks, however, gradually spilled over to the broader market, and the negative price action appeared to reinforce the idea that the market's recent pullback may not yet have run its course. The CBOE Volatility Index increased 6.4% to 28.58, which was a relatively modest gain.
Losses steepened in the afternoon without much interest to buy the dip. Shares of AAPL fell 4% while TSLA fell 10% post-Battery Day. On a related note, UBS resumed coverage on Apple with a Neutral rating, versus a prior Buy rating.
Data from the Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering shows there are now 31.7M confirmed cases of COVID-19 worldwide, including 6.9M in the U.S., and 972,372 deaths due to the disease, including 201,000 in the U.S.
Separately, the House passed a government funding bill through Dec. 11 that the Senate is expected to pass later this week. Notwithstanding this piece of good news, general uncertainty surrounding the election, the coronavirus, and the economy likely increased the cash appeal.
In other auto news, California Governor Gavin Newsom announced that he will "aggressively move the state further away from its reliance on climate change-causing fossil fuels while retaining and creating jobs and spurring economic growth," issuing an executive order requiring sales of all new passenger vehicles to be zero-emission by 2035 and additional measures to "eliminate harmful emissions from the transportation sector."
Among the notable gainers was WDC, which rose 6.7% after the company announced that it is reorganizing and creating separate business units for its Flash and Hard Drive product businesses.
Among the notable losers was JPM, which was lower by 1.6% after Bloomberg reported that the bank is set to pay close to $1B to resolve market manipulation investigations by U.S. authorities into its trading of metals futures and Treasury securities.
Additionally, shares of DAL fell 2.2% as Bloomberg said that the airline is in talks with EADSY to delay at least 40 aircraft deliveries planned for this year due to the airline's struggles with a travel market hit by the coronavirus pandemic.
Elsewhere, European stocks closed higher Wednesday as investors reacted to key data releases from the euro zone and weighed up the possibility of further stimulus measures for the region. Stocks in Asia-Pacific were mixed on Wednesday.

Currency

The U.S. Dollar Index rose 0.4% to 94.32, reaching its best level in nearly four months.

Treasury

U.S. Treasuries ended Wednesday on a modestly lower note, but once again, intraday action was confined to a narrow range. The trading day started with modest losses after overnight action saw a rally in European markets, which reflected a rebound in risk tolerance. However, that rebound was short-lived, resulting in a slide into the European close and more weakness on Wall Street.

Commodity

Oil rose more than 1% on Wednesday, supported by U.S. government data that showed crude and fuel inventories dropped last week, although concerns about the ongoing coronavirus pandemic capped gains. Spot gold dipped 1.5% to $1,870.11 per ounce, having hit its lowest since Aug. 12 at $1,865.03.

Crypto

Bitcoin fell as investors sold equities, gold and other fiat currencies on renewed coronavirus concerns.

YTD

  • FAAMG + some penny stocks +18.5% YTD
  • Spoos +0.2% YTD
  • Old man -6.2% YTD
  • Russy -13% YTD

What Patrick, the Cat says?

The S&P 500 is down 5.3% in September while the Nasdaq Composite is down 6.9%. The market could go either way today (to state the obvious).
Summary scraped from the interweb. Took 0.36 seconds.
submitted by hibernating_brain to thewallstreet [link] [comments]

Weekly Wrap 23/10

Market News
Bitcoin reached yearly highs this week as the price dislocated from moves in traditional markets, breaking beyond the $12,500 level set in August before ending the week more than 12% up. The bullish mood was boosted by news of PayPal’s plans to enable cryptocurrencies to be bought, sold and spent through its online wallets. The move will make digital assets a viable payment method for its 346 million active accounts and 26 million merchants worldwide. Altcoins initially lost ground as Bitcoin led the rally but, as expected, saw stronger performance as Bitcoin cooled off.
Traditional markets were largely driven by the implications of accelerating pandemic second waves in Europe (with curfews and other restrictions being ramped up), as well as parts of the US. This market-negative news was countered somewhat by growing prospects for further stimulus for the hard-hit Eurozone economy. On the US stimulus front, a Tuesday deadline set by the Democrats came and went and negotiations are ongoing, with some holding out hope that a weekend agreement can be reached. However, pre-election stimulus prospects are still weak with the Republican-controlled Senate showing major opposition, despite promising to at least consider any bill.
The US dollar found itself under pressure from the euro and British pound as the UK returned to the Brexit negotiating table and further European stimulus was priced in, but bounced slightly Thursday as expectations for timeous inflationary US stimulus waned. Gold mirrored dollar movements, rising to mid-week before falling to end the period flat.
Global stocks, as well as the US S&P500 suffered under the combined weight of the pandemic threat, fears of a no-deal Brexit, and downgraded US stimulus expectations. The tech-dominated US Nasdaq index was again the exception, benefiting from some safe-haven flows and above-expectation earnings announcements from a host of companies - this despite the US government bringing a bi-partisan antitrust lawsuit against Google, which only managed to weigh on US tech early in the week.
Industry News
Market Indicators
Other News
submitted by Camaa to cryptotwenty [link] [comments]

Weekly Wrap 23/10

Market News
Bitcoin reached yearly highs this week as the price dislocated from moves in traditional markets, breaking beyond the $12,500 level set in August before ending the week more than 12% up. The bullish mood was boosted by news of PayPal’s plans to enable cryptocurrencies to be bought, sold and spent through its online wallets. The move will make digital assets a viable payment method for its 346 million active accounts and 26 million merchants worldwide. Altcoins initially lost ground as Bitcoin led the rally but, as expected, saw stronger performance as Bitcoin cooled off.
Traditional markets were largely driven by the implications of accelerating pandemic second waves in Europe (with curfews and other restrictions being ramped up), as well as parts of the US. This market-negative news was countered somewhat by growing prospects for further stimulus for the hard-hit Eurozone economy. On the US stimulus front, a Tuesday deadline set by the Democrats came and went and negotiations are ongoing, with some holding out hope that a weekend agreement can be reached. However, pre-election stimulus prospects are still weak with the Republican-controlled Senate showing major opposition, despite promising to at least consider any bill.
The US dollar found itself under pressure from the euro and British pound as the UK returned to the Brexit negotiating table and further European stimulus was priced in, but bounced slightly Thursday as expectations for timeous inflationary US stimulus waned. Gold mirrored dollar movements, rising to mid-week before falling to end the period flat.
Global stocks, as well as the US S&P500 suffered under the combined weight of the pandemic threat, fears of a no-deal Brexit, and downgraded US stimulus expectations. The tech-dominated US Nasdaq index was again the exception, benefiting from some safe-haven flows and above-expectation earnings announcements from a host of companies - this despite the US government bringing a bi-partisan antitrust lawsuit against Google, which only managed to weigh on US tech early in the week.
Industry News
Market Indicators
Other News
submitted by Camaa to InvictusCapital [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to conspiracy [link] [comments]

The bitcoin exchange rate has fallen below $11,000: miners and strong dollar keep putting pressure on it

The bitcoin exchange rate has fallen below $11,000: miners and strong dollar keep putting pressure on it

https://preview.redd.it/61zp40sr25l51.jpg?width=918&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=6010466be89ea3603e1d8dc901c2d0d18b1659a4

Miners may cause the BTC exchange rate to collapse because of competition

Data from CryptoQuant proves that mining pools have transferred large amounts of bitcoin to exchanges.
On September 2, the Poolin, Slush and HaoBTC pools moved 1,630 BTC (about $18,5 mln) to exchanges. The indicator is above the average daily value — the transactions started at the moment when the bitcoin price fell below the level of $11,500.
CryptoQuant Head Ki Young Joo supposed that miners may push the market through to push out competitors.
"I think it's going to be the war of miners between those who want a Bitcoin price rally and those who don't. As I know, some Chinese miners already realize their mining profitability (return on investment), and they might not want new mining competitors joining the industry because of the bull market", — he remarked.

Dollar is getting stronger and keeps putting pressure on bitcoin

Cointelegraph analyst Joseph Young points out that the dollar index has rebounded from its multi-year support zone sending down the exchange rates of bitcoin and gold.
Dollar has become stronger since the beginning of September sending bitcoin down from $12,000 to $10,400. The European Central Bank stated this week that it would seek to compensate the growth of euro. Young notes that it will also support the US dollar and undermine the positions of bitcoin and gold even more.
"Currency analysts believe the ECB could continue to “dampen” the strength of the euro. In the short term that could cause the dollar to rally, which might place selling pressure on Bitcoin and gold", the expert concludes.
submitted by bestchange_pr to bestchange [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Forecast for XAU/USD: Gold churns out records

Forecast for XAU/USD: Gold churns out records

Fundamental forecast for gold for today

Precious metal climbed too high

It’s done! What gold bugs had been dreaming about for decades happened: the price has reached a level of $2,000 per ounce. The weakness of the US dollar, the fall of the 10-year U.S. Bond yield to unbelievable minus 1%, and unstoppable growth of ETF reserves did their work. Meanwhile, gold bugs grew much older: according to JP Morgan’s research, the precious metal is usually bought by aged investors, while young traders prefer Bitcoin or high-tech stocks.
Many may find it surprising that gold is growing amidst the rally of US stock indexes. That often happens during recessions, though: enormous volumes of central banks’ cheap liquidity allow investors to build up long positions in risky and reliable assets. What’s more, the market prefers precious metals when it’s unsure about GDP’s recovery.

S&P 500’s and gold’s evolutions

Source: Trading Economics
Even if gold climbed high, there are still a lot of bullish forecasts: Goldman Sachs believes that the prices may go up to $2300 per ounce because investors are looking for a new reserve currency; RBC Capital Markets projects a level of $3,000.
XAU/USD bulls may have succeeded because the recession didn’t follow the 2007-2009 scenario. Then, the Fed’s monetary stimuli were enough for getting the economy back to the trend; now, it’s unclear. Then, the USD was growing as the US GDP’s recovery rate was faster than its global peers’ one; now, it’s falling amidst the economic divergence of growth. Then, the idea that inflation would speed up amidst increased money supply failed; now, it’s still alive. The difference between then and now allows us to say that gold hasn’t stop rallying yet.
The best scenario for gold would be a W-shape recovery of the US economy. It implies extending monetary and fiscal stimuli, further weakening the USD, and a drop in real US bond yields. However, a V-shape recovery of GDP will allow XAU/USD quotes to grow too. A long-term downtrend of the USD index is doubtless. At the same time, the Fed makes it clear that it’s ready to tolerate high inflation, which will raise the bond market rates.

Gold and expected inflation dynamics

Source: Wall Street Journal
The second coronavirus wave in Europe is the main factor in the development of the bullish scenario for gold. Under this scenario, the euro will fall, the USD index will grow and will probably continue growing as the divergence of economic growth will benefit the USA. That scenario is unlikely to happen. So, hold your long positions formed at $1820-1825 per ounce and build them up during retracements. XAU/USD may correct on the Congress’s approval of a new fiscal relief package and strong stats on the US labor market.
For more information follow the link to the website of the LiteForex
https://www.liteforex.com/blog/analysts-opinions/forecast-for-xauusd-gold-churns-out-records/ ?uid=285861726&cid=79634
submitted by Maxvelgus to Finance_analytics [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to Money [link] [comments]

Banca internacional #03 UK LT BG MT DE – Intro EU y Fintech

Este contenido fue publicado originalmente el 06/08/2019 - Aca
Posts anteriores de la serie

Background e intro
La Union Europea y en cuestión el Area Economica Europea o single market es un colectivo de veintiocho estados, cuales en su mayoría abolieron todo tipo de controles migratorios internos. También llamado Area Schengen, aunque esta, no incluye los veintiocho miembros sino, veintiséis.

De la misma manera, el “single market” o Eurosystem, mercado común europeo y su moneda de facto el Euro, ISO 4217 : EUR no se usa en todos los miembros del área política. Sin embargo todos los miembros de la Union Europea y varias de las jurisdicciones que no usan el Euro como su moneda de intercambio oficial (Romania, Polonia, Suiza, Dependencias de la corona, etc.) son parte del área SEPA compuesta por 36 miembros.

SEPA, Single Euro Payment Area es un protocolo de créditos y débitos bancarios entre personas físicas o legales de rápida ejecución operando 100% bajo el estándar IBAN. Es moderno comparado con otros sistemas similares como el ACH o wires locales americanos, ciertamente anticuados y de un costo mucho mas alto de operar.

Por regulación del ECB (European Central Bank) los pagos SEPA ya sean créditos o débitos deben ser gratuitos y se considera ilegal cobrar por una transferencia SEPA.

Esto dicho, varias instituciones cobran un “fee” por la ejecución de transferencias SEPA bajo alguna descripción a modo de eufemismo.

Si bien SEPA es considerado relativamente moderno, SEPA ICT (Instant Credit Transfer) ya se encuentra desarrollado y en proceso de implementación. Bajo el nuevo standard, las transferencias SEPA son ejecutadas en tiempo real con el fin de incentivar la implementación y adopción de las tecnologías fintech desarrolladas por privados bajo el tutelaje del ECB.

Desde hace aproximadamente diez años, el ECB comenzó a liberalizar el mercado bancario a modo de desconcentrar el monopolio de la banca europea. De esta manera dieron comienzo a las entidades EMI (Electronic Money Institutions). Entidades quasi bancarias, las cuales pueden ofrecer IBANs personales de manera instantánea y emitir tarjetas de pago (en general no debito sino prepagas directamente ligadas a una cuenta personal).

Regulación

La flexibilización de la banca europea via fintech tiene sus rarezas, la mayoría de las nuevos “bank challengers” usaron frases del tipo “we are not a bank, we are better tan a bank” y similares. Muy cool a los ojos de un millenial rebelde sin embargo el wording es exacto. Una entidad EMI no es un banco, no está siquiera remotamente cerca de serlo. Estas entidades no operan con efectivo, ni en general ofrecen créditos, o inversiones o tasas de interés (mas allá de que la tasa de interés del ECB se encuentra en el área negativa hace años) porque la verdad es que una entidad EMI no está a autorizada a tomar depósitos en Euros.

Cuando decimos “Electronic Money Institution” en realidad debería leerse más como “token”, la gente que usa crypto entenderá de manera más fácil. Al momento del depósito, la entidad mueve nuestros Euros a una cuenta a su nombre en una entidad bancaria real en general en la jurisdicción en la cual está registrada y licenciada aunque esto no es necesario. Los depósitos, a diferencia de un banco, no se pueden ofrecer a modo de prestamos ni se pueden invertir y se deben mantener segregados. Como una especie de cuenta escrow. En el mismo momento, de manera instantánea intercambia 1 for 1 cada euro por un token dentro de su plataforma al que le podemos poner el símbolo y nombre de euro pero al mismo tiempo no lo es. Al momento de efectuar un pago fuera de la plataforma el ejecutor intercambia nuevamente nuestro token por 1 euro cash que se encuentra depositado en la cuenta escrow y lo envía via SEPA o SEPA card hacia un comercio o una persona física/juridica a modo de pago.

Esta pequeña diferencia hace que el statement “we are not a bank” tenga un significado mucho más verosímil en lo legal de lo aparentemente anunciado. Y por esta razón, suelen lidiar con clientes de mayor riesgo que un banco tradicional. A manera de un sandbox monetario.

El problema principal, más allá de la oferta de banca básica y el peligro de que la entidad desaparezca de la noche a la mañana sin dejar rastro. Los depósitos en las EMIs no están cubiertos por el seguiro de depósitos de ninguna jurisdicción ni por el ECB.

En un comienzo, hace unos años uno podía abrir una cuenta en algún país del báltico, recibir una tarjeta MasterCard en Euros y empezar a recibir pagos de manera instantánea luego de un onboarding básico de 5 minutos vía una App. Algunos proveedores inclusive ofrecen una dirección de Bitcoin a la cual, si uno envía BTC, es convertido automáticamente a depósitos en EUR a la cotización del momento del clearing de la transaccion. Suena too good to be true no?

Bueno MasterCard y Visa también pensaron eso. En el 2018 cancelaron todas las tarjetas de los EMIs en Europa y renegociaron las licencias de emisión. Muchos proveedores de servicios financieros nunca emitieron tarjetas nuevamente y se dedicaron solo a cuentas virtuales. Los proveedores que sobrevivieron y encontraron su nicho se vieron en una situación grow or die.

Pero como se puede crecer sin poder ofrecer más servicios bancarios, crypto estaba sufiendo un slump terrible… Ah si, licencias bancarias.

Y así llegamos al presente, donde “we are not a bank” es una falacia y si, ya somos un banco. Tenemos una licencia, aseguramos tus depósitos y podemos ofrecer más servicios bancarios. El passporting de servicios está en toda su gloria, a costo de muchos de nuestros beneficios. La consecuencia principal? Todos los usuarios de riesgo, eliminados. Non-residents? Fuera, Gambling? Fuera, Crypto trading? Fuera…

KYC más estricto(si se lo puede llamar asi), mayor escrutinio de transacciones, CRS, suspensiones de cuentas y otros detalles están a la orden del día.

En la situación actual, siguen existiendo EMIs que hacen menos preguntas al costo de algunos Euros por mes. Donde podemos enviar y recibir fondos de un crypto Exchange o de TransferWise (a contrariedad de BruBank*… EJEM…*) y operar pagos de manera normal. No es un arreglo definitivo pero es de bajo costo y puede servir de “buffer” entre negocios que pueden atraer cierto escrutinio a nuestras cuentas en banco tradicionales.

Obviamente esto es un arma de doble filo y afecta a todos los miembros de la cadena de la misma forma. En mi caso, tuve que hacer un “White listing” luego de un intercambio de emails con soporte, de cuentas en Lithuania en las Crypto Exchanges que uso porque no querían procesar mis depósitos y ponían todas mis transacciones on hold de manera indefinida. La explicación? “Too much fraud from those suppliers”.

Esto dicho, para las instituciones que no son crypto friendly, esto puede ser la salvación. Un depósito de otra cuenta a tu nombre es mejor que un depósito a nombre de Kraken Payward o Bitstamp Limited.

Las licencias bancarias son un gran desarrollo para el mundo fintech europeo, lamentablemente tiene un gran costo a nivel usuario. Hay muchos menos proveedores que ofrezcan servicio a no residentes.

Los riesgos de los EMIs son reales, muchos han desaparecido sin dejar rastro, otros como WorldCore se vieron enrollados en lavado de dinero Ruso y cancelación masiva de sus tarjetas por parte de Visa y MasterCard Europe a punto tal que se vieron obligados a cerrar. WorldCore sigue en venta hoy día. SataBank un banco digital basado en Malta de capitales Bulgaros entro en administración para nunca más reaparecer.

Otros tuvieron que reinventarse o separarse. PayMix se disolvió en dos compañías una para personas físicas y otra para personas legales. Ejemplos de este tipo existen por montones.

Instituciones de interés

Globitex – UK/Lithuania
https://globitex.com/euro-wallet
Licencia: Crypto UK/Wallet EMI Lithuania
Cuentas: Personal/Business
Tarjeta: No.
No residentes: Si.
Detalle: Globitex es un crypto broker el cual simplifica el intercambio de crypto por fiat via el uso de un servicio de wallet (EMI) el cual posee un IBAN personalal y unico a nombre del UBO de la cuenta.
El servicio tiene algunos costos sin embargo es una buena alternativa para ejecutar pagos via SEPA.
En este momento 14 dias de trading sin costo, imagino que las operaciones de la cuenta si tienen costo, sin embargo desde que empezaron a ofrecer el servicio, los cargos por operar se han reducido substancialmente.

MisterTango – Lithuania
https://www.mistertango.com/en/
Licencia: EMI
Cuentas: Personal/Business
Tarjeta: Temporalmente suspendidas.
No residentes: Si.
Detalle: Las cuentas funcionan, la mía personalmente desde hace más de 2 años. Existe integración a su propia exchange de crypto. Ofrecen servicios para traders de crypto y dirección de BTC con deposito a EUR instantáneo.
Hay que tener en cuenta que la oferta de servicios en el pasado era muy superior. Incluía dirección de BTC, transferencias SWIFT, transferencias SEPA, tarjeta MasterCard Euro, acceso al Exchange, top up de la cuenta via tarjetas de debito/crédito y opción de una API para facturar.
Hoy día está dividido en diferentes segmentos y el pricing varía según el paquete elegido, nacionalidad y residencia.

LeoPay – Bulgaria
https://leopay.eu/
Licencia: EMI
Cuentas: Personal/Business con preferencia a Estonian e-residents.
Tarjeta: Si, debito Visa, con condición de dos tarjetas por cuenta o una tarjeta por currency.
No residentes: Si.
Detalle: Originalmente llamado LeuPay registrado en Malta de capitales Bulgaros. Usaban de backend SataBank, así que si leyeron lo anterior entenderán el cambio de nombre de la entidad.
Cuentas multicurrency en EUR, USD, GBP, CHF, RON, HRK, JPY, BGN, PLN, CZK.

Paysera – Lituania
https://www.paysera.lt/v2/lt-LT/index
Licencia: EMI
Cuentas: Personal/Business. Es posible obtener más de una cuenta por cliente.
Tarjeta: Si, debito Visa.
No residentes: Si.

PayMix Pro – Malta
https://www.paymix.pro/
Licencia: Institución financiera Maltesa
Cuentas: Business
Tarjeta: Debito
No residentes: Si.

Prospero – Malta
https://www.yourprospero.com/
Licencia: Institución financiera Maltesa
Cuentas: Personal
Tarjeta: Debito
No residentes: Si.

Deutsche Handelsbank – Alemania
https://www.handelsbank.com/en/bc/home-business-customers.html
Licencia: Bancaria propia.
Cuentas: Business. Es posible obtener más de una cuenta por cliente.
Tarjeta: No.
No residentes: Si.
Detalle: Es un pequeño banco alemán que se especializan en cuentas únicamente para personas legales con licencia y backend bancario propio.

N26 – Alemania
Licencia: Bancaria propia.
Cuentas: Personal/Business
Tarjetas: Debito/Crédito
No residentes: No*.
Detalle: No aceptan no-residentes en el Area economía europea, sin embargo si aceptan pasaporte Argentino y cualquier numero de móvil. El requerimiento es una dirección de correo en el Área Económica para recibir la tarjeta. (Chripre no es una opción para la dirección).

Revolut – Lithuania/UK
https://www.revolut.com/
Licencia: Bancaria propia (UK)
Cuentas: Personal/Business.
Tarjeta: Si, variedad dependiendo del tier.
No residentes: No*
Detalle: Revolut evoluciono desde una licencia de EMI a una entidad con licencia bancaria. Siempre en las noticias por las razones equivocadas, han quedado atrás los días en los que la banca Lituana los decepcionaba. Lamentablemente los reportes de cuentas congeladas persisten y rehabilitarlas puede tardarse meses.
Revoluto ofrece tarjetas con conversión de divisas usando el mid-market rate y sin FX conversion fee. Ofrecen crypto trade (CFDs) y muy recientemente una plataforma de inversiones. Si han leído mi post titulado Banca internacional #02 – United Kingdom, where it all began y repararon en el detalle de que la licencia bancaria es de Reino Unido, si, están en lo correcto. Esta entidad no puede técnicamente aceptar no-residentes si tiene una licencia bancaria ringfenced. Sin embargo, tal como es el caso con varias de alternativas, una dirección de correo dentro de Reino Unido o Europa suele bastarle a los clientes para hacerse de una cuenta.
UPDATE: Recientemente Revolut agrego un setting muy interesante, la cual permite, una vez registrados como clientes cambiar la residencia fiscal. No hay muchos datos con respecto a qué efectos tiene sobre la cuenta más allá de una suspensión quasi instantánea. Sin embargo! Según la jurisdicción de residencia fiscal seleccionada, también nos puede dar como opción “Email us to [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) and let’s see what we can do.”

TransferWise
https://transferwise.com/
Licencia: Money transfer (UK), EMI (Lithiania)
Cuentas: Personal/Business y Borderless, 4 currencies GBP, EUR, NZD, AUD y condicionalmente USD.
Tarjeta: Si, MasterCard para residentes del Area Economica Europea.
No residentes: Si.
Detalle: Conocido por casi todos hoy día, la aplicación de cabecera para remittances elegida por todos los millenials. No es la mejor sin embargo es la que tiene mejor publicidad y estrategia.
Se sabe que hay clientes quienes han usado datos postales europeos para registrarse y han logrado recibir la tarjeta en condición de no residentes.

Disponibles fuera de sus países de registro en breve

Insha – Alemania con backing de Al Baraka (Turquía)
https://www.getinsha.com/
Detalle: Primer banca islámica digital en Europa. Que esto no los detenga en ver el servicio que ofrecen. Dado los servicios que ofrecen (y la carencia de interés computado en depósitos) es una plataforma idea para banca Islámica.

ToMoRRoW - Alemania
https://www.tomorrow.one/en-de/
Detalle: Banca alemana sustentable.

Kontist – Alemania
https://kontist.com/
Detalle: Banca digital para pequeños negocios o freelancers con implementación de contabilidad y taxación.

Tarjetas

Algunos EMIs solo ofrecen tarjetas. En general son productos sub-prime y consecuentemente los fees son usureros. No voy a entrar en detalle sobre el ofrecimiento de servicios de estos proveedores, pero les dejo algunos por una cuestión de mera curiosidad y cobertura de alternativas.


Nota final
Existen muchos servicios más de tipo pseudo bancario en Europa. Podría publicar un post infinito con 500 URLs y links a cada uno de ellos. Muchos con respaldo de Bancos centenarios y prácticamente todos con requerimiento de residencia en la Unión Europea. Si desean mas información, puedo hacer un post apartado. Pero más allá del landing page, no van a poder utilizar ningún servicio.
Es más fácil abrir una cuenta en un banco normal para no residentes en Europa de manera personal que intentar circunventar la legislación y regulación pertinente a los bancos o EMIs digitales reservados para Europeos.

Donations.
Token Wallet address BTC 19xvUdQoZosrzYKNaTCK834zRkg5Bogop BCH qqqmyqjspnq0fazk9wvv0elc8vxdp2rkvgfqs3s87x LTC LKNvBgwEtE3w7oEUYiSVb96qCe7xFDBvp8 ETH/DAI 0x1cbbcf2ca8849893ad7feac5ef5c735f6d91fa4e XMR 44AXEt8ZkmjgGuUrPaoNTzBGhp92L3HozSYxAip7dz8qL6A3neJBriLRSjC8Qnam4tEhfw2yXzcXsbZ2dJiWHDC7Ji8nBvx 
submitted by diyexageh to LATAM_PersonalFinance [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to economy [link] [comments]

Full Option Koinpro

In today's world of heavily nascent and volatile cryptocurrency, one point or factor stands out. That is exchanges. Cryptocurrency exchanges are sites(whether physical or virtual) where cryptocurrencies are traded for each other or traditional fiat currencies like Euro, Pound Sterling or US Dollar. They may be divided by many criteria, chief of which may be Modus Operandi or Central Control. The Degree of Control suggests a central control of exchange management and resources. There are Centralized, Decentralized and Hybrid exchanges. Now we can narrow down to Centralized Exchanges. These are where transactions are monitored and controlled by the owners of the exchange. Transactions can be made only through mechanisms provided and approved by the central body. Also there is no access to private keys by traders. Examples include Koinpro, Binance, Kucoin, Bittrex etc.
About Koinpro This is a Smart Bitcoin Futures Exchange. KoinPro, your new fangled crypto exchange, that goes beyond crypto and boasts of multiple futures contracts, with its own unique features and benefits. Bitcoin Futures, Contracts for Difference are complex instruments. Trading these financial products carries a high level of risk since leverage can work both to your advantage and disadvantage. There are a lot of exchanges, both crypto and fiat(mainstream and otherwise) trading tools like CFD, oil, futures etc; but not one of them Integrates CFDs like Koinpro. Its a no-brainer choice, since going for KoinPro’s unique double-UP contract, customers can simply enter into a predefined order position that will automatically terminate when the position either gains or loses 100% of its value, or when the contract expires — whichever comes first. insurance coverage is provided as a courtesy to BitGo Prime, which is a sole counterparty Prices derived from a wide range of Tier 1 institutions such as exchanges and professional market makers Trading on a fully non-disclosed basis Fully integrated with BitGo Portfolio & Tax. At KoinPro, we take the safety and security of our clients extremely seriously. To help make KoinPro one of the safest places to trade, we store our customer funds in cold storage wallets provided by BitGo—the world leader in secure digital asset storage. BitGo custody includes a $100 million insurance plan underwritten by Lloyd’s of London—one of the UK’s largest insurance markets.
This insurance coverage is provided as a courtesy to KoinPro users and hence comes at no additional cost. This insurance coverage protects digital assets held by BitGo, Inc. or BitGo Trust Company in the event of;
Third-party hacks or theft of private keys Insider theft by employees of private keys Physical loss or damage of private keys
BitGo has delivered institution-grade security for digital assets since 2013, and features state-of-the-art cold storage technology, which includes a bank-grade Class III vault and stringent controls designed to practically eliminate the risk of loss. Full details about the BitGo custody and insurance protection can be found here.
https://koinpro.com/
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5219842
submitted by redoc77 to ICOAnalysis [link] [comments]

All about Koinpro

As crypto evolves and improves, services like KoinPro, that go beyond crypto and boasts of multiple futures contracts run up with its own unique features and benefits. Bitcoin Futures, Contracts for Difference are complex instruments. Trading these financial products carries a high level of risk since leverage can work both to your advantage and disadvantage as always. These assets are precious metals, oil etc.
Gold Spot
Spot gold trading, as offered by Koinpro, is just the online buying or selling gold at the live price with no market makers or brokers in spot gold trading. Spot gold traders can buy or sell fractional amounts of gold bars, ingots or coins. The spot price, as opposed to a futures contract, of a precious metal like Gold (XAU) or Silver (XAG) is the cash price of that metal in the market at the current point in time. Precious metal trading is the act of exchanging Gold or Silver spot prices for a major currency. An example of this is the pair XAGEUR (trades Silver against the Euro), or XAUGBP (Gold against the British Pound). Key benefits of trading precious metals Widely regarded as potential safe havens Good for diversifying your investment portfolio Popular trading choices during times of volatility
The Dow Jones Index
This is a stock market index that measures the stock performance of 30 large companies listed on stock exchanges in the United States. Although it is one of the most commonly followed equity indices, many consider the Dow to be an inadequate representation of the overall U.S. stock market compared to broader market indices such as the S&P 500 Index or Russell 3000 because it only includes 30 large cap companies, is not weighted by market capitalization, and does not use a weighted arithmetic mean.
The Euro Stoxx 50 Index
This index integrates 50 stocks from 11 Eurozone countries. The index is licensed to financial institutions to serve as an underlying for a wide range of investment products such as exchange-traded funds (ETFs), futures, options and structured products.
WTI Crude Oil
(WTI) West Texas Intermediate is a grade or a mix of crude oil, and/or the spot price, the futures price, or the assessed price for that oil; colloquially WTI usually refers to the price of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) WTI Crude Oil futures contract or the contract itself. The WTI oil grade is also known as Texas light sweet, although oil produced from any location can be considered WTI if the oil meets required qualifications.[1] Spot and futures prices of WTI are used as a benchmark in oil pricing. This grade is described as light crude oil because of its relatively low density, and sweet because of its low sulfur content.
https://koinpro.com/
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5219842
submitted by redoc77 to Crypto_General [link] [comments]

buying crypto currency at Degiro

Hello ,
In the last couple of days I have been considering to buy cryptocurrency. The plan is to invest a small amount around 50 to 75 euro into the cryptocurrency. I chose to invest a small amount because of the high volatility and the positive asymmetric risk involved. I also want to invest in it because I believe that it is a good hedge against the institutionalized system. With institutionalized system I mean the financial system and all the institutions that are connected with it. Why hedge against the financial system? Because given the current macro-economic trajectories and the possible action of central bank (CB) There is a possibility that the world of tomorrow might be looking a lot different then the world of today including the financial system => revaluation???:
https://moderntimesinvestors.com/economics/debt-cycle-financial-crisis/
https://www.piie.com/sites/default/files/documents/pb19-18.pdf
interesting invest talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WA1Ji-Hj1qo&feature=emb_rel_end
Now that I have some grounds to base my decision on and have decided what to do , I need to invest in cryptocurrency. There are of course multiple ways to invest in cryptocurrency, but given the fact that I use Degiro , my options will be limited.
What I found on investing in cryptocurrency using Degiro :
shares:
price : 29,80 euro
currently not able to buy
price : 0,182 euro
ETF - ETP:
price: 422,73 euro (fund is denominated in Swedisch Croner)
AMUN BITCOIN CRYPTO SINGLE : https://21shares.com/product/abtc
price: 48,02 dollar
Warrants:
OE Part.Z17(18/unl.) Bitcoin
MiniL O.End Bitcoin 6390 , 10600, 6190,2835, 3374 ,
When I look at the options, I already want to leave out the warrants because they are expensive due to the high volatility. So no Warrants, the only two that remain are ETF's and shares. If we look at shares Bitcoin group SE is the better one of the two in my opinion given the fact that it is more vertically integrated into the bitcoin economy while cryptologic only does mining and is a penny stock which has had his high days I presume. Now I am less inclined to invest into a business than Bitcoin itself, because of the idiosyncratic risk that a company faces., but I must commit that Bitcoin group SE is a promising company : https://www.bitcoingroup.com/userfiles/downloads/HB2019/BitcoinGroup_HJB2019_EN.pdf
This only leaves us to the ETF's or rather the ETP's . I cannot buy the Bitcoin tracker one because of the price thus this leaves only AMUN Bitcoin Crypto single in my options.
Now I have only one options left which is not really a choice in my opinion: I cannot compare different ETF or Stocks with each other and cannot really decide if this is a good ETF or Stock compared to the rest of the market. So I was hoping if some of you guys can help me in:
Already a big thanks in advance,
OKONOX
submitted by okonox to eupersonalfinance [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to investing_discussion [link] [comments]

Bitcoin and Meritocratic Capitalism

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to Capitalism [link] [comments]

Digital Gold Token; A stable coin that helps you save for the dry season

Digital Gold Token; A stable coin that helps you save for the dry season
In 2019 Bitcoin continues to grow. This has led to many early adopters of innovation. The starting of the cryptocurrency finance enterprise may be tough to characterize over the years. A few human beings don't forget bitcoin to be worldwide cash, but others see it as a store of wealth like gold. I believe that digital cash revolutionized each project organizations and the finances tool.
Therefore these superior resources can connect to actual sources like "Gold" and rather than replacing them. In different words, many ahead and reverse desk and agent jobs can be bought in lieu of Gold held in digital wallets.

https://preview.redd.it/nek3u41ufr351.jpg?width=275&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=6f0a8592aa5abef5689354697b151b292f25a34c
Gold has been used to keep the rich solid via financial instances. Many cryptocurrency watchers be given that cryptocurrencies will in truth update gold as a store of treasured cost that is vital in the international financial stage.
Updated block chain can record random exchanges, song products and minimize looting, making it appear appropriate for a warehouse commercial enterprise. Innovation isn't always restrained to a fixed of clues, it's miles full of an encrypted and everlasting database and may be made to be had to all contributors.
Cryptocurrency speculators lose loads of wealth in weeks after becoming a chaebol within the medium term and just want to discover the fact. While this could take a look at power, it shows the very suspicious nature of digital cash, specifically cash for products and joint ventures.

https://preview.redd.it/ukv5yw3vfr351.jpg?width=900&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=4b9cb5b1c1bed06d64a5c39cf1962323d467d383
INTRODUCTION OF GOLD STABLECOIN.
GOLD Stablecoins are a complicated asset of some other era deliberately entrusted or dependent on real gold deposited in a blanketed save. Stablecoin Gold is primarily based at the Ethereum Block Chain `` ERC 2.0 ''.
Many strong currencies are traded at a 1: 1 ratio with sure denomination standards inclusive of US greenbacks or Euros, however Gold Stable coins are fixed as Gold assets.
Gold Stable coin is a automated cryptocurrency subsidized by way of actual gold, bought on every occasion the token is issued and enlisted in a danger-free safe in Singapore.

IMPORTANCE OF STABLECOIN.
The an increasing number of appealing stable coin is largely more fixed than the conventional shape of cryptocurrency. This is based totally on evidence that nice is tied to other sources (like US greenbacks or gold).
Therefore, stable coins appreciate the many advantages of getting no passwords (easy, comfy, secure, no unique measurement related to most cryptocurrencies).
Stable coins are a easy, balanced, flexible and at ease exchange approach for using digital shape planning methods.
As a simplified, balanced, flexible and comfortable method of alternate. All matters taken into consideration, maximum companies, evidently, are not interested by accepting a coins like bitcoin that might be valuable the following day.

https://preview.redd.it/zulkpp1yfr351.jpg?width=300&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=d6dd04d60816d8c98cb6cc6e998a8a0c34ab0039

THE STABLECOIN GOLD FOUNDATION.
Stable coins represent all factors of real interest in the money-associated administrative surroundings.
By empowering a secure and strong decentralized framework, the whole lot from cross-lending to monetary preparations may be moneymaking. For instance, with decentralized lending, stable coins can assist make sure a strong domain for P2P exchanges that occur with out the desire of the use of an unstable virtual foreign money like Bitcoin to achieve this.
Broadly, this can exchange the programs which might be related to applications on the cryptocurrency area, speculators and blockchain-based totally agencies.
They can provide cryptocurrency holders with, for example, hiding locations within the occasion of a market crash, as they could convert their belongings from mainly unpredictable kinds of virtual cash into stable coins. .
Gold-backed Stable coin holders essentially preserve an unmistakable useful resource of proper price - some thing that most cryptocurrencies do not have. These wars can also even be admitted in an incentive after a time frame, which offers an expanded impetus for individuals to preserve and use those currencies.
On the account of pledged stable coins, anyone in the world can positioned assets into precious metals like gold, or maybe land in Switzerland. These styles of benefits are frequently saved for prosperity, however stable coins open up new comprehensible results of task projects for ordinary human beings around them.

https://preview.redd.it/czxhxe30gr351.jpg?width=311&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=d609552c3ba9e84adbaab1a0479c41d020eea038
The basics of losing tokens in evaluation to the one of a kind types of cryptocurrencies, reduce the ability of economic professionals to surrender possibilities for monetary buyers. You can change this token for Gold. After that, speculators have to not lose all cash because of marketplace events.
To get further information, news updates and developments regarding new listing on exchange or perhaps increased total supply in tokens and vault, use the links below:
Official Website: https://gold.Storage/ White paper: https://gold.Storage/wp.Pdf Telegram: https://t.Me/digitalgoldcoin Twitter: https://twitter.Com/gold_erc20

Author: cytpoway121 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?action=profile;u=2202709
submitted by cytpoway to ICOAnalysis [link] [comments]

Which Tkeycoin service will help you quickly buy and withdraw cryptocurrency to your bank card?

Which Tkeycoin service will help you quickly buy and withdraw cryptocurrency to your bank card?

https://preview.redd.it/tq75xr8mmtx41.png?width=1154&format=png&auto=webp&s=261c1e3d534856e9dac4796ebd3cbad54d51429b
In anticipation of upcoming events — we want to share with You information about our new service, which will rapidly develop and provide users with maximum convenience in depositing and withdrawing funds. We have already said that Tkeycoin is a single system, and we combine the most necessary functions on our platform.
Now on the official website, there is a service for buying cryptocurrency, which supports the function of buying Tkeycoin (TKEY) using a Bankcard. The most important thing is that you can make a deposit in any currency, either in foreign currency or using rubles, and get a 25% bonus when making a deposit.
For Asian countries, we have enabled an additional service — replenishment via WeChat. The Asian market is quite active in the digital direction, and the listing is just around the corner, so this is a nice bonus for our Asian partners.

https://i.redd.it/p1cxcqzomtx41.gif
This means that soon it will be possible not only to Deposit funds, but also to get access to the service of withdrawing funds to a Bankcard.
On the market, many services and exchanges seek to provide a service for buying cryptocurrency using a Bankcard. And in principle — this is not new, but the conditions may be different, someone takes a Commission of up to 7% for replenishment and 3.5% for withdrawal, someone does not have support for replenishment in rubles or other currencies, and you can only top-up in dollars, some services do not work with Russia and CIS countries at all.
The entire TKEY platform is created for today’s active business people. Our goal is to make the market clear and accessible, it is advisable to start with the convenience of customers. Now we are fully working without commissions and any fees. You can deposit money in any currency — rubles, dollars, euros, and other currencies. The system automatically converts any currency, whether it is tenge or pound sterling.
You can buy cryptocurrency from anywhere in the world, wherever you are. Not every user wants to register on the exchange, and sometimes there is simply no time for a transfer, for creating order and withdrawing funds — here our service will help you, which provides a quick purchase and withdrawal of funds. And don’t forget that in the next releases, exchange functions will be available in TKEYSPACE.

https://i.redd.it/mavjk2armtx41.gif
Can someone tell us what this service is for if there is a listing coming up soon? This service is necessary both before and after the listing because getting the most loyal conditions and convenience of the service — You can always top up your wallet in TKEYSPACE with a Bankcard, and in the future with other cryptocurrencies. After listing, the current price will be linked to the exchange price.
For example, you want to quickly and easily buy Bitcoin, Ripple or Tkeycoin, but the Commission of the exchanger or exchange does not suit you. You go to our service, enter Your Address (regardless of whether it is the address of the exchange or the Address generated in TKEYSPACE), you make a payment and the currency you choose is quickly credited to your wallet.

https://preview.redd.it/w3g395ssmtx41.png?width=1180&format=png&auto=webp&s=644b9682f43fbd0b33ddf6dc7af69994c2a16953
The service provides a secure channel without unnecessary intermediaries and with low commissions. Withdrawal, exchange, purchase, and replenishment of other cryptocurrencies will be available in the next releases.
With this service — You can use your credit card to buy Tkeycoin directly, and in the future, to buy other cryptocurrencies. We want to provide Tkeycoin users with the fastest and easiest access to digital assets in the most secure way possible.
And most importantly, it creates the foundation for future services in TKEYSPACE and TKEYPAY, easy quick exchanges, input and output, storage, and replenishment in Fiat currency.
Connect to the service, ask questions, manage to get a bonus and, as we said, be in the trend. We’ll be flying soon!
#tkeycoin

https://preview.redd.it/je4qht9umtx41.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=c699ced8a111e3ade8f86d3a055d3f40b617b80e
submitted by tkeycoin to Tkeycoin_Official [link] [comments]

Crypto-Currency: A Guide to Common Tax Situations

STATUS: Majority of questions have been answered. If yours got missed, please feel free to post it again.
Introduction
All,
Based on the rapid increase in popularity and price of bitcoin and other crypto currencies (particularly over the past year), I expect that lots of people have questions about how crypto currency will impact their taxes. This thread attempts to address several common issues. I'm posting similar versions of it here, in several major crypto subs, and eventually in the weekly "tax help" threads personalfinance runs.
I'd like to thank the /personalfinance mod team and the /tax community for their help with this thread and especially for reading earlier versions and offering several valuable suggestions/corrections.
This thread is NOT an endorsement of crypto currency as an investing strategy. There is a time and a place to debate the appropriateness of crypto as part of a diversified portfolio - but that time is not now and that place is not here. If you are interested in the general consensus of this sub on investing, I would urge you to consult the wiki while keeping in mind the general flowchart outlining basic steps to get your finances in order.
Finally, please note that this thread attempts to provide information about your tax obligations as defined by United States law (and interpreted by the IRS under the direction of the Treasury Department). I understand that a certain portion of the crypto community tends to view crypto as "tax free" due to the (actual and perceived) difficulty for the IRS to "know" about the transactions involved. I will not discuss unlawfully concealing crypto gains here nor will I suggest illegal tax avoidance activities.
The Basics
This section is best for people that don't understand much about taxes. It covers some very basic tax principles. It also assumes that all you did during the year was buy/sell a single crypto currency.
Fundamentally, the IRS treats crypto not as money, but as an asset (investment). While there are a few specific "twists" when it comes to crypto, when in doubt replace the word "crypto" with the word "stock" and you will get a pretty good idea how you should report and pay tax on crypto.
The first thing you should know is that the majority of this discussion applies to the taxes you are currently working on (2017 taxes). The tax bill that just passed applies to 2018 taxes (with a few very tiny exceptions), which most people will file in early 2019.
In general, you don't have to report or pay taxes on crypto currency holdings until you "cash out" all or part of your holdings. For now, I'm going to assume that you cash out by selling them for USD; however, other forms of cashing out will be covered later.
When you sell crypto, you report the difference between your basis (purchase price) and proceeds (sale price) on Schedule D. Your purchase price is commonly referred to as your basis; while the two terms don't mean exactly the same thing, they are pretty close to one another (in particular, there are three two ways to calculate your basis - your average cost, a first-in, first-out method, and a "specific identification" method. See more about these here and here). EDIT - you may not use average cost method with crypto - see here. If you sell at a gain, this gain increases your tax liability; if you sell at a loss, this loss decreases your tax liability (in most cases). If you sell multiple times during the year, you report each transaction separately (bad news if you trade often) but get to lump all your gains/losses together when determining how the trades impact your income.
One important thing to remember is that there are two different types of gains/losses from investments - short term gains (if you held an asset for one year or less) and long term gains (over one year; i.e. one year and one day). Short term gains are taxed at your marginal income rate (basically, just like if you had earned that money at a job) while long term gains are taxed at lower rates.
For most people, long term capital gains are taxed at 15%. However, if you are in the 10% or 15% tax bracket, congrats - your gains (up to the maximum amount of "unused space" in your bracket) are tax free! If you are in the 25%, 28%, 33%, or 35% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 15%. If you are in the 39.6% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 20%. Additionally, there is an "extra" 3.8% tax that applies to gains for those above $200,000/$250,000 (single/married). The exact computation of this tax is a little complicated, but if you are close to the $200,000 level, just know that it exists.
Finally, you should know that I'm assuming that you should treat your crypto gains/losses as investment gains/losses. I'm sure some people will try and argue that they are really "day traders" of crypto and trade as a full time job. While this is possible, the vast majority of people don't qualify for this status and you should really think several times before deciding you want to try that approach on the IRS.
"Cashing Out" - Trading Crypto for Goods/Services
I realize that not everyone that "cashes out" of crypto does so by selling it for USD. In fact, I understand that some in the crypto community view the necessity of cashing out itself as a type of myth. In this section, I discuss what happens if you trade your crypto for basically anything that isn't cash (minor sidenote - see next section for a special discussion on trading crypto for crypto; i.e. buying altcoins with crypto).
The IRS views trading crypto for something of value as a type of bartering that must be included in income. From the IRS's perspective, it doesn't matter if you sold crypto for cash and bought a car with that cash or if you just traded crypto directly for the car - in both cases, the IRS views you as having sold your crypto. This approach isn't unique to crypto - it works the same way if you trade stock for something.
This means that if you do trade your crypto for "stuff", you have to report every exchange as a sale of your crypto and calculate the gain/loss on that sale, just as if you had sold the crypto for cash.
Finally, there is one important exception to this rule. If you give your crypto away to charity (one recognized by the IRS; like a 501(c)(3) organization), the IRS doesn't make you report/pay any capital gains on the transaction. Additionally, you still get to deduct the value of your donation on the date it was made. Now, from a "selfish" point of view, you will always end up with more money if you sell the crypto, pay the tax, and keep the rest. But, if you are going to make a donation anyway, especially a large one, giving crypto where you have a big unrealized/untaxed gain is a very efficient way of doing so.
"Alt Coins" - Buying Crypto with Crypto
The previous section discusses what happens when you trade crypto for stuff. However, one thing that surprises many people is that trading crypto for crypto is also a taxable event, just like trading crypto for a car. Whether you agree with this position or not, it makes a lot of sense once you realize that the IRS doesn't view crypto as money, but instead as an asset. So to the IRS, trading bitcoin for ripple isn't like trading dollars for euros, but it is instead like trading shares of Apple stock for shares of Tesla stock.
Practically, what this means is that if you trade one crypto for another crypto (say BTC for XRP just to illustrate the point), the IRS views you as doing the following:
  • Selling for cash the amount of BTC you actually traded for XRP.
  • Owing capital gains/losses on the BTC based on its selling price (the fair market value at the moment of the exchange) and your purchase price (basis).
  • Buying a new investment (XRP) with a cost basis equal to the amount the BTC was worth when you exchanged them.
This means that if you "time" your trade wrong and the value of XRP goes down after you make the exchange, you still owe tax on your BTC gain even though you subsequently lost money. The one good piece of news in this is that when/if you sell your XRP (or change it back to BTC), you will get a capital loss for the value that XRP dropped.
There is one final point worth discussing in this section - the so called "like kind exchange" rules (aka section 1031 exchange). At a high level, these rules say that you can "swap" property with someone else without having to pay taxes on the exchange as long as you get property in return that is "like kind". Typically, these rules are used in real estate transactions. However, they can also apply to other types of transactions as well.
While the idea is simple (and makes it sound like crypto for crypto should qualify), the exact rules/details of this exception are very fact specific. Most experts (including myself, but certainly not calling myself an expert) believe that a crypto for crypto swap is not a like kind exchange. The recently passed tax bill also explicitly clarifies this issue - starting in 2018, only real estate qualifies for like kind exchange treatment. So, basically, the vast majority of evidence suggests that you can't use this "loophole" for 2017; however, there is a small minority view/some small amount of belief that this treatment would work for 2017 taxes and it is worth noting that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this approach.
Dealing with "Forks"
Perhaps another unpleasant surprise for crypto holders is that "forks" to create a new crypto also very likely generate a taxable event. The IRS has long (since at least the 1960s) held that "found" money is a taxable event. This approach has been litigated in court and courts have consistently upheld this position; it even has its own cool nerdy tax name - the "treasure trove" doctrine.
Practically, what this means is that if you owned BTC and it "forked" to create BCH, then the fair market value of the BCH you received is considered a "treasure trove" that must be reported as income (ordinary income - no capital gain rates). This is true whether or not you sold your BCH; if you got BCH from a fork, that is a taxable event (note - I'll continue using BTC forking to BCH in this section as an example, but the logic applies to all forks).
While everything I've discussed up to this point is pretty clearly established tax law, forks are really where things get messy with taxes. Thus, the remainder of this section contains more speculation than elsewhere in this post - the truth is that while the idea is simple (fork = free money = taxable), the details are messy and other kinds of tax treatment might apply to forks.
One basic practical problem with forks is that the new currency doesn't necessarily start trading immediately. Thus, you may have received BCH before there was a clear price or market for it. Basically, you owe tax on the value of BCH when you received it, but it isn't completely clear what that value was. There are several ways you can handle this; I'll list them in order from most accurate to least accurate (but note that this is just my personal view and there is ongoing disagreement on this issue with little/no authoritative guidance).
  • Use a futures market to determine the value of the BCH - if reliable sources published realistic estimates of what BCH will trade for in the future once trading begins, use this estimate as the value of your BCH. Pros/cons - futures markets are, in theory, pretty accurate. However, if they are volatile/subject to manipulation, they may provide an incorrect estimate of the true value of BCH. It would suck to use the first futures value published only to have that value plummet shortly thereafter, leaving you to pay ordinary income tax but only have an unrealized capital loss.
  • Wait until an exchange starts trading BCH; use the actual ("spot" price) as the value. Pros/cons - spot prices certainly reflect what you could have sold BCH for; however, it is possible that the true value of the coin was highelower when you received it as compared to when it started trading on the exchange. Thus this method seems less accurate to me than a futures based approach, but it is still certainly fairly reasonable.
  • Assume that the value is $0. This is my least preferred option, but there is still a case to be made for it. If you receive something that you didn't want, can't access, can't sell, and might fail, does it have any value? I believe the answer is yes (maybe not value it perfectly, but value it somewhat accurately), but if you honestly think the answer is no, then the correct tax answer would be to report $0 in income from the fork. The IRS would be most likely to disagree with this approach, especially since it results in the least amount of income reported for the current year (and the most favorable rates going forward). Accordingly, if you go this route, make extra sure you understand what it entails.
Note, once you've decided what to report as taxable income, this amount also becomes your cost basis in the new crypto (BCH). Thus, when you ultimately sell your BCH (or trade it for something else as described above), you calculate your gain/loss based on what you included in taxable income from the fork.
Finally, there is one more approach to dealing with forks worth mentioning. A fork "feels" a lot like a dividend - because you held BTC, you get BCH. In a stock world, if I get a cash dividend because I own the stock, that money is not treated as a "treasure trove" and subject to ordinary income rates - in most cases, it is a qualified dividend and subject to capital gain rates; in some cases, some types of stock dividends are completely non taxable. This article discusses this idea in slightly more detail and generally concludes that forks should not be treated as a dividend. Still, I would note that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this theory.
Ultimately, this post is supposed to be practical, so let me make sure to leave you with two key thoughts about the taxation of forks. First, I believe that the majority of evidence suggests that forks should be treated as a "treasure trove" and reported as ordinary income based on their value at creation and that this is certainly the "safest" option. Second, out of everything discussed in this post, I also believe that the correct taxation of forks is the murkiest and most "up for debate" area. If you are interested in a more detailed discussion of forks, see this thread for a previous version of this post discussing it at even more length and the comments for a discussion of this with the tax community.
Mining Crypto
Successfully mining crypto coins is a taxable event. Depending on the amount of effort you put into mining, it is either considered a hobby or a self-employment (business) activity. The IRS provides the following list of questions to help decide the correct classification:
  • The manner in which the taxpayer carries on the activity.
  • The expertise of the taxpayer or his advisors.
  • The time and effort expended by the taxpayer in carrying on the activity.
  • Expectation that assets used in activity may appreciate in value.
  • The success of the taxpayer in carrying on other similar or dissimilar activities.
  • The taxpayer’s history of income or losses with respect to the activity.
  • The amount of occasional profits, if any, which are earned.
If this still sounds complicated, that's because the distinction is subject to some amount of interpretation. As a rule of thumb, randomly mining crypto on an old computer is probably a hobby; mining full time on a custom rig is probably a business.
In either event, you must include in income the fair market value of any coins you successfully mine. These are ordinary income and your basis in these coins is their fair market value on the date they were mined. If your mining is a hobby, they go on line 21 (other income) and any expenses directly associated with mining go on schedule A (miscellaneous subject to 2% of AGI limitation). If your mining is a business, income and expenses go on schedule C.
Both approaches have pros and cons - hobby income isn't subject to the 15.3% self-employment tax, only normal income tax, but you get fewer deductions against your income and the deductions you get are less valuable. Business income has more deductions available, but you have to pay payroll (self-employment) tax of about 15.3% in addition to normal income tax.
What if I didn't keep good records? Do I really have to report every transaction?
One nice thing about the IRS treating crypto as an asset is that we can look at how the IRS treats people that "day trade" stock and often don't keep great records/have lots of transactions. While you need to be as accurate as possible, it is ok to estimate a little bit if you don't have exact records (especially concerning your cost basis). You need to put in some effort (research historical prices, etc...) and be reasonable, but the IRS would much rather you do a little bit of reasonable estimation as opposed to just not reporting anything. Sure, they might decide to audit you/disagree with some specifics, but you earn yourself a lot of credit if you can show that you honestly did the best you reasonably could and are making efforts to improve going forward.
However, concerning reporting every transaction - yes, sorry, it is clear that you have to do this, even if you made hundreds or thousands of them. Stock traders have had to go through this for many decades, and there is absolutely no reason to believe that the IRS would accept anything less from the crypto community. If you have the records or have any reasonable way of obtaining records/estimating them, you must report every transaction.
What if I don't trust you?
Well, first let me say that I can't believe you made it all the way down here to this section. Thanks for giving me an honest hearing. I would strongly encourage you to go read other well-written, honest guides. I'll link to some I like (both more technical IRS type guides and more crypto community driven guides). While a certain portion of the crypto community seems to view one of the benefits of crypto as avoiding all government regulation (including taxes), I've been pleasantly surprised to find that many crypto forums contain well reasoned, accurate tax guides. While I may not agree with 100% of their conclusions, that likely reflects true uncertainty around tax law that is fundamentally complex rather than an attempt on either end to help individuals unlawfully avoid taxes.
IRS guides
Non-IRS guides
submitted by Mrme487 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

Oil with surcharge and gasoline at a loss. Why is it good for bitcoin.

Oil with surcharge and gasoline at a loss. Why is it good for bitcoin.

Oil with surcharge and gasoline at a loss. Why is it good for bitcoin.
Quotations of supply futures for raw materials of the WTI and Urals brands fell below $0, the price of Brent barrels started to fall too. What is the reason for this, when the situation normalizes and how will it affect the prospects of digital money.
On Monday, April 20, an extraordinary event happened in the oil market: May WTI delivery futures dropped to -$40. This means that the manufacturer will pay the buyer if he can pick up the raw materials and partially unload the storage. This situation happened yesterday with another variety, the Russian Urals. Its price fell to -$2. Brent also suffered, maybe not so much, but over the past day its rate has fallen by 9%, to $23.77.
As a result, wholesale prices for gasoline fell sharply below cost in Russia, and oil companies were forced to sell it at a loss. Now companies are losing about 2.3 thousand rubles per ton of AI-92. This situation was caused by a decrease in demand for fuel due to a drop in car traffic.
The reaction of the ruble and bitcoin
The ruble also reacted to a drop in oil prices. His quotes fell to two-week lows. In the evening of April 20, the dollar exchange rate was 75.27 rubles, the euro — 81.69 rubles, according to the Moscow Exchange. According to EXANTE Managing Partner Alexei Kirienko, a reversal in commodity prices has returned anxiety to financial markets.
“Once again, the sensitivity of the ruble and other financial instruments to the dynamics of markets is growing — all of them risk switching to risk-off mode. This means selling everything, including gold and bitcoin, as well as increasing traction in the dollar. It is likely that the ruble, which now looks abnormally strong with the current negative dynamics of oil, may at some point fall into decline», the expert suggested.
He explained that negative oil prices are associated with an extreme manifestation of its oversupply. It is likely that the Cushing oil storage facility where the supply is going is full. Those who bought oil have no opportunity to accept it. The decrease in value provoked a surge of margin calls, and many traders received losses, the specialist added.
“No one could even imagine such a picture and did not put it into their models. However, there is a positive side to bitcoin in this story: now no one can say that it is worthless, because oil, for example, is already in the red”, concluded the specialist.
Bitcoin crash risks
Yesterday, amid the turmoil in the oil market, Bitcoin fell in price. Its price again fell below $7,000. Now the first cryptocurrency costs $6917, over the past day it has lost 4% of its value. The coin has been trading at these levels in the past few weeks, and its volatility has fallen to a three-month low. This usually speaks in favor of the onset of strong fluctuations.
On Monday, analyst Omkar Godbowl predicted that the main digital coin could soon fall in price to a key support level of $6450. Another trader, Yashu Gola, also spoke about the fast strong movements on April 20. According to him, the asset risks falling to $6,500, and then to $5,000.
The opposite opinion is shared by Nikita Zuborev, senior analyst at Bestchange.ru. He believes that now the first cryptocurrency is in a range convenient for buying, and there are no serious prerequisites for a further fall: while the traditional market is experiencing turbulence, cryptocurrencies are becoming more attractive to investors.
“If we compare the trend with world indices and the price of oil, we will not see any significant matches. Moreover, if there was any dependence of the cryptocurrency market on the hydrocarbon futures market, we would see a sharp rise after the rollback of WTI oil prices this morning”, Zuborev says.
According to him, in a crisis, you can see the trend for the sale of assets, including cryptocurrencies, but this does not mean the connection of digital money with world indices.
The situation with oil will not affect Bitcoin in any way, a much more important factor today is halving, to which only three weeks remain, the analyst added.
“The halving factor may negatively affect the price of bitcoin in the next few months before the shortage in the market becomes noticeable, but this will not be directly related to the trends of the traditional market”, the specialist noted.
The relationship of bitcoin, stocks and oil
Analyst of IAC “Alpari” Vladislav Antonov agreed with Zuborev. He also believes that at the moment the situation with oil does not affect the cryptocurrency market. However, digital money shows a very strong connection with the S&P500 index — the correlation is 0.8, the expert noted.
“Falling oil prices will negatively affect the Russian economy. Brent is now trying to find a foothold after yesterday’s WTI collapse. Sellers know that they are strong, so they will aim at 1998 levels at $9.55”, the analyst suggested.
Experts believe that at the moment there is no direct connection between the fall of oil and the decline in the value of cryptocurrencies. The situation with negative prices for WTI and Urals, on the contrary, could have a positive effect on the attitude of investors towards digital money.
Even if their price drops significantly due to the crisis, as was the case in March, when BTC lost 50% of its value in two days, this will not affect the fundamental characteristics of the new type of asset. So, his future will remain promising, current prices will be profitable to buy.
submitted by Smart_Smell to Robopay [link] [comments]

A guide to index funds

A few weeks ago I wrote a post about some things it took me a while to figure out when I started investing. This was well received, and there were some interesting follow up questions, especially around what to invest in. A commonly recommended strategy on this sub-reddit is to invest in index funds, but that was another thing that it took me a while to figure out, and my first post didn't really get that far, so I present the spiritual successor: Things I Wish I'd Known Earlier About Index Funds
This write-up is intended to broadly answer the question:
How do I invest in a way that my returns will track the overall UK, US, or global stock market?
N.B. I've also cross-posted this to a https://reboapp.co.uk/content/index-funds/, which is a knowledge base I'm building for UK investors. Let me know if there are any particular topics you'd like me to write about in future.

What is an index?

An index is a calculated value that summarises the performance of some category of assets into a single number which can be tracked over time. For indexes which track stock markets, this is typically the total valuation of the companies in some section of the stock market. For example, the FTSE 100 is an index which tracks the value of the largest 100 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange.
Market indexes are normally calculated using capitalisation weighting, where the companies included in the index are selected based on their market valuation, and the larger the market valuation of a company, the more weight it is given in the index.

What is a capitalisation-weighted index?

In a capitalisation-weighted index, the index is calculated by summing the total market value of all of the companies. This means that if one company is worth £20 billion, and another is worth £10 billion, the former company will contribute twice as much to the index. A 10% increase in the price of the former company would increase the index by twice as much as a 10% rise in the latter company.
An index is also usually normalised, so that it starts at a nice value like 1,000 on the first day it is measured. This normalisation happens by recording the sum of the market values of the companies on the first day, and then dividing later measures by this amount.

What is an index fund?

An index fund (also commonly referred to as a 'tracker') is a wrapper which will hold shares in the various assets in an index, weighted by the same weighting as in the index, so that the value of the index fund should track the underlying index closely over time. If the index goes up by 3%, then so should the index fund.
For example, an index fund which tracks the FTSE 100 has £1 billion invested in it in total, then that £1 billion will be used by the fund manager to buy £1 billion worth of shares in the FTSE 100 companies, weighted by their market value, so that the fund would hold twice as much of a £20 billion company than a £10 billion company. As the valuations rise and fall, and as companies come in and out of the FTSE 100, the index fund will buy and sell shares to keep their allocation as close to the FTSE 100 weighting as possible.

Why use capitalisation weighting for an index?

By using a capitalisation-weighted index, the index is measuring how the market is choosing to allocate capital. If the market value of one company in the index is £20 billion (the total value of all of the company's shares adds up to £20 billion), and another company has a market value of £10 billion, then the shareholders are valuing the first company at twice as much as the second. If they weren't, then some people would sell shares in the company that they thought was overvalued, and buy shares in the other company that they thought was undervalued, until the prices shifted to match what people think. Of course some people might think this, while others think the opposite, so the market value only represents the average sentiment of the shareholders. There is no correct objective valuation, only the valuation that comes from the average of all the shareholder decisions. This is why we talk about market value rather than just value. By using a capitalisation-weighted index, the index tracks this market valuation.
Now we could define loads of different indexes based on completely different criteria. For example, rather than worrying about market capitalisation, we could form an index based upon the value of all companies whose names begin with an 'L'. It's unlikely that this would tell us anything particularly interesting about the market though!

Why the market average is the best you can do

When you invest in an index fund tracking a capitalisation-weighted index, you are delegating your investment decisions to the market. You will be investing in companies in the index in proportion to how much capital everyone else has invested in these companies. This may seem like blindly following the herd, and you might think that you can do better than this, but you almost certainly can't.
The reason you can't beat the market is that it's a zero-sum game - if you're going to do better than the average, someone else has to do worse than the average. So if you are going to do better than the market average over the long term, you need to make better decisions than at least 50% of the other people making active investment decisions. When the market contains institutional investors, hedge funds, people with PhDs, very fast computers, and significant amounts of money, it's unlikely that you're going to be in the upper half.
Instead of trying to beat the market average yourself, you might be tempted to invest in an actively managed fund, where the investors try to make strategic picks to beat the market. The managers of such funds certainly have more resources available to them than you, and some even have excellent histories of market beating returns. However, there's no way for you to tell if an actively managed fund is actually better than the market average, or if they've just been lucky in the past.
To illustrate this, consider the following thought experiment: If I pick 500 people and ask them to flip a coin 10 times in a row, I'd expect one or two of them to get 10 heads in row. If we pick one of those people, and look at their coin flipping record, then this person appears to be very talented at flipping a coin and getting heads. However, if I asked them to flip the coin again, they would have a 50/50 chance, just like everyone else. So in a world where there are many actively managed funds, some will have done better than the market average in the past. But how can we tell whether they were just lucky, or, on the contrary, if they will continue to beat the market? The unfortunate answer is you likely can't.

Structure of Index Funds

So far, we've covered the basics of the index fund concept, but in order to actually get your money invested, you'll need to know a little bit about what real index funds look like in practice. If you haven't already, this might be a good time to review my original post on getting started with investing.
In the UK there are two common types index funds:
The legal structure of these funds doesn't matter too much to you as a personal investor, but there are some differences between OEICs and ETFs that you should be familiar with:
For more information on the differences between OEICs and ETFs, check out this write up from Monevator, as well as the wiki here in /ukpersonalfinance:

Company size, geography and other factors

Hopefully the previous sections have demystified the workings of indexes and index funds to some degree. However, you may still have questions about which index funds to invest in. That's worth a whole separate write up, but here is a brief overview of the landscape of some of the different types of index funds that are available:

Large cap, mid cap and small cap

Large cap companies are those with the largest capitalisations, and in the UK typically refers to the FTSE 100 companies. That is, the largest 100 companies in the UK. The smallest company in the FTSE 100 has a market capitalisation of around £4 billion. Some example index funds tracking large cap companies are:
Mid cap companies are those with smaller capitalisations, typically referring to the FTSE 250 companies, which are the 101st-350th companies in the UK by market capitalisation. The market capitalisation of these ranges between around £4 billion to £500 million. Some example index funds:
Small cap companies are those with smaller market capitalisations still, but it's a less well defined list than large or mid cap companies. An example index fund:

Geography

Index funds also provide a convenient way to invest in foreign markets, outside the UK. The funds are located in the UK, and priced in GBP, so they are very accessible to a UK investor, but can hold investments in European, US, or global markets.
The S&P 500 index is similar to the FTSE 100 index in the UK, but tracking the top 500 companies in the US. The Vanguard S&P 500 ETF is an index fund tracking the S&P 500.
Likewise, the EURO STOXX 50 index tracks the largest 50 companies in Europe, and can be invested in through index funds such as the iShares EURO STOXX 50 UCITS ETF.
There also exist indexes which aim to track the global market, such as the MSCI World index.

Other assets

As well as indexes which track company valuations, there are indexes which track bond valuations. For example the Vanguard UK Government Bond Index Fund aims to track the Bloomberg Barclays U.K. Government Float Adjusted Bond Index.
Index funds can also track other asset classes, like gold, property, and even alternative assets like Bitcoin.

Funds of funds

A single index typically represents a narrow cross section of the world, likely tracking only companies of a certain size, in a certain region, or a certain asset class. You may need to hold investments tracking multiple indexes in order to have a diversified portfolio across different assets types, company sizes and geographies. Rather than doing this manually, it is also possible to invest directly in a fund of funds. In this case, the fund holds a number of different underlying funds, tracking different indexes. This allows a single fund to have appropriate diversification.
Some examples of these funds of funds, particularly those aimed at passive investors are:
Hopefully this article has helped to explain what an index fund is, and why you might be interested in investing in index funds. The above examples are certainly not a full list of the available indexes and index funds, and you should definitely do further research into which funds are most appropriate for your investment goals.
Good luck with your investment journey!
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