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BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repo updated to version 1.9.0

The BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repository has been updated to serve version 1.9.0 is available at:
 
https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin-unlimited/+archive/ubuntu/bucash
 
This release is compatible the Bitcoin Cash protocol. To update already installed packages:
 
sudo apt update sudo apt upgrade 
 
To install
 
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin-unlimited/bucash sudo apt-get update sudo apt install bitcoind bitcoin-qt 
 
starting from this update the repository is serving also ElectrsCash(**) v2.0.0, for now just for the amd64 architecture. To install it just execute this command:
sudo apt install electrscash 
 
See the official announcement and the release notes for more details:
https://old.reddit.com/btc/comments/ih2eyt/bch_unlimited_190_has_just_been_released/
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/release/doc/release-notes/release-notes-1.9.0.md
 
Known issues:
On Ubuntu 18.04 (bionic) you'll probably get an error while trying to install bitcoind. The error message is the following:
The following packages have unmet dependencies. bitcoind : Depends: libgcc-s1 (>= 3.4) but it is not installable E: Unable to correct problems, you have held broken packages. Package libgcc-s1 is not available, but is referred to by another package. This may mean that the package is missing, has been obsoleted, or is only available from another source 
To solve the problem please do:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-test sudo apt update sudo apt dist-upgrade sudo apt install bitcoind 
 
(**) ElectrsCash is an efficient re-implementation of Electrum Server written in Rust.
submitted by s1ckpig to btc [link] [comments]

BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repo updated to version 1.9.0

The BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repository has been updated to serve version 1.9.0 is available at:
 
https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin-unlimited/+archive/ubuntu/bucash
 
This release is compatible the Bitcoin Cash protocol. To update already installed packages:
 
sudo apt update sudo apt upgrade 
 
To install
 
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin-unlimited/bucash sudo apt-get update sudo apt install bitcoind bitcoin-qt 
 
starting from this update the repository is serving also ElectrsCash(**) v2.0.0, for now just for the amd64 architecture. To install it just execute this command:
sudo apt install electrscash 
 
See the official announcement and the release notes for more details:
https://old.reddit.com/btc/comments/ih2eyt/bch_unlimited_190_has_just_been_released/
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/release/doc/release-notes/release-notes-1.9.0.md
 
Known issues:
On Ubuntu 18.04 (bionic) you'll probably get an error while trying to install bitcoind. The error message is the following:
The following packages have unmet dependencies. bitcoind : Depends: libgcc-s1 (>= 3.4) but it is not installable E: Unable to correct problems, you have held broken packages. Package libgcc-s1 is not available, but is referred to by another package. This may mean that the package is missing, has been obsoleted, or is only available from another source 
To solve the problem please do:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-test sudo apt update sudo apt dist-upgrade sudo apt install bitcoind 
 
(**) ElectrsCash is an efficient re-implementation of Electrum Server written in Rust.
submitted by s1ckpig to Bitcoincash [link] [comments]

Connecting bitcoin-qt to bitcoind on local network

Hello,
I have a bitcoin node running on a headless box (bitcoind) and I would like to connect to it using bitcoin-qt on my desktop. I'm getting a little confused with the process.... does bitcoin-qt need to connect to bitcoind using RPC? Do I store my wallet file on the bitcoind box, or bitcoin-qt box?
The bitcoin node is already setup to work with an electrum server, so I already have rpcbind=0.0.0.0, rpcallowip=$ELECTRUX_IP, and rpcuserpcpassword set. I tried adding my desktop IP to rpcallowip, and setting the appropriate username/password in bitcoin-qt's bitcoin.conf, but no luck. I can see in debug.log for bitcoin-qt that the connection is rejected.

The node runs over TOR and I have onlynet=onion set in bitcoind's bitcoin.conf, but that doesn't seem to stop electrumx connecting via RPC over clearnet, so this shouldn't be an issue right?

Am I missing something here? Help would be much appreciated!
submitted by backfromBTCpast to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repo updated to version 1.8.0

The BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repository has been updated to serve version 1.8.0 is available at:
 
https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin-unlimited/+archive/ubuntu/bucash
 
This release is compatible the Bitcoin Cash protocol. To update already installed packages (*):
 
sudo apt update sudo apt upgrade 
 
To install
 
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin-unlimited/bucash sudo apt-get update sudo apt install bitcoind bitcoin-qt 
 
starting from this update the repository is serving also ElectrsCash(**) v.1.1.1, for now just for the amd64 architecture. To install it just execute this command:
sudo apt install electrscash 
 
See the official announcement and the release notes for more details:
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/g3k4mbch_unlimited_180_has_just_been_released/
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/release/doc/release-notes/release-notes-1.8.0.md
 
Known issues:
On Ubuntu 18.04 (bionic) you'll probably get an error while trying to install bitcoind. The error message is the following:
The following packages have unmet dependencies. bitcoind : Depends: libgcc-s1 (>= 3.4) but it is not installable E: Unable to correct problems, you have held broken packages. Package libgcc-s1 is not available, but is referred to by another package. This may mean that the package is missing, has been obsoleted, or is only available from another source 
It seems like libgcc-s1 which is a focal (ubuntu 20.04, still in beta) package that has somehow crept in the bionic "food-chain", I'm working on a fix right now. Thanks to xd1gital for the initial report.
Edit: to solve the problem please do:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-test sudo apt update sudo apt dist-upgrade sudo apt install bitcoind 
 
(*) due to fact we rebranded Ubuntua PPA name along with the name of the clients, you will be displayed with this warning and question to which you could safely reply "Yes":
E: Repository 'http://ppa.launchpad.net/bitcoin-unlimited/bucash/ubuntu bionic InRelease' changed its 'Label' value from 'BU Cash' to 'BCH Unlimited' N: This must be accepted explicitly before updates for this repository can be applied. See apt-secure(8) manpage for details. Do you want to accept these changes and continue updating from this repository? [y/N] 
  (**) ElectrsCash is an efficient re-implementation of Electrum Server written in Rust.
submitted by s1ckpig to bitcoin_unlimited [link] [comments]

BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repo updated to version 1.8.0

The BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repository has been updated to serve version 1.8.0 is available at:
 
https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin-unlimited/+archive/ubuntu/bucash
 
This release is compatible the Bitcoin Cash protocol. To update already installed packages (*):
 
sudo apt update sudo apt upgrade 
 
To install
 
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin-unlimited/bucash sudo apt-get update sudo apt install bitcoind bitcoin-qt 
 
starting from this update the repository is serving also ElectrsCash(**) v.1.1.1, for now just for the amd64 architecture. To install it just execute this command:
sudo apt install electrscash 
 
See the official announcement and the release notes for more details:
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/g3k4mbch_unlimited_180_has_just_been_released/
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/release/doc/release-notes/release-notes-1.8.0.md
 
Known issues:
On Ubuntu 18.04 (bionic) you'll probably get an error while trying to install bitcoind. The error message is the following:
The following packages have unmet dependencies. bitcoind : Depends: libgcc-s1 (>= 3.4) but it is not installable E: Unable to correct problems, you have held broken packages. Package libgcc-s1 is not available, but is referred to by another package. This may mean that the package is missing, has been obsoleted, or is only available from another source 
It seems like libgcc-s1 which is a focal (ubuntu 20.04, still in beta) package that has somehow crept in the bionic "food-chain", I'm working on a fix right now. Thanks to xd1gital for the initial report.
Edit: to solve the problem please do:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-test sudo apt update sudo apt dist-upgrade sudo apt install bitcoind 
 
(*) due to fact we rebranded Ubuntua PPA name along with the name of the clients, you will be displayed with this warning and question to which you could safely reply "Yes":
E: Repository 'http://ppa.launchpad.net/bitcoin-unlimited/bucash/ubuntu bionic InRelease' changed its 'Label' value from 'BU Cash' to 'BCH Unlimited' N: This must be accepted explicitly before updates for this repository can be applied. See apt-secure(8) manpage for details. Do you want to accept these changes and continue updating from this repository? [y/N] 
  (**) ElectrsCash is an efficient re-implementation of Electrum Server written in Rust.
submitted by s1ckpig to btc [link] [comments]

BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repo updated to version 1.8.0

The BCH Unlimited Ubuntu PPA repository has been updated to serve version 1.8.0 is available at:

 

https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin-unlimited/+archive/ubuntu/bucash

 

This release is compatible the Bitcoin Cash protocol. To update already installed packages (*):

 

sudo apt update
sudo apt upgrade

 

To install

 

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin-unlimited/bucash
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt install bitcoind bitcoin-qt

 

starting from this update the repository is serving also ElectrsCash(**) v.1.1.1, for now just for the `amd64` architecture. To install it just execute this command:

sudo apt install electrscash

 

See the official announcement and the release notes for more details:

https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/g3k4mbch_unlimited_180_has_just_been_released/

https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/release/doc/release-notes/release-notes-1.8.0.md

 

Known issues:

On Ubuntu 18.04 (bionic) you'll probably get an error while trying to install `bitcoind`. The error message is the following:

The following packages have unmet dependencies.
bitcoind : Depends: libgcc-s1 (>= 3.4) but it is not installable
E: Unable to correct problems, you have held broken packages.

Package libgcc-s1 is not available, but is referred to by another package.
This may mean that the package is missing, has been obsoleted, or
is only available from another source

It seems like [libgcc-s1](https://packages.ubuntu.com/focal/libgcc-s1) which is a focal (ubuntu 20.04, still in beta) package that has somehow crept in the bionic "food-chain", I'm working on a fix right now. Thanks to xd1gital for the initial report.

 

(*) due to fact we rebranded Ubuntua PPA name along with the name of the clients, you will be displayed with this warning and question to which you could safely reply "Yes":

E: Repository 'http://ppa.launchpad.net/bitcoin-unlimited/bucash/ubuntu bionic InRelease' changed its 'Label' value from 'BU Cash' to 'BCH Unlimited'
N: This must be accepted explicitly before updates for this repository can be applied. See apt-secure(8) manpage for details.
Do you want to accept these changes and continue updating from this repository? [y/N]

 
(**) ElectrsCash is an efficient re-implementation of Electrum Server written in Rust.
submitted by s1ckpig to Bitcoincash [link] [comments]

BTCPay Server + EPS + RTL - how?

I am trying to build a box with: - Linux Ubuntu 18.04 - BTCPay Server, using docker - EPS (Electrum Personal Server) - RTL (Ride the lightning)
I have the full bitcoin data synced in a folder already, from a previous bitcoin-qt/bitcoind instance.
  1. Can I install BTCPay Server with docker and then run beside another docker with EPS?
  2. I understand that RTL is already integrated into BTCPay, so I just have to update the server and activate it?
  3. Is possible to integrate also EPS into the BTCPay docker file, after the installation? Or is it in "works" to be integrated in the same docker installation/update server by BTCPay ?
  4. Is possible to run EPS without docker, but using the bitcoind from BTCPay docker instance?
  5. Is possible to connect a mobile wallet (ex. Samourai) to that bitcoind instance from BTCPay Server ?
  6. One last question: is there a procedure to backup all the BTCPay server settings, for in case of disaster recovery moment? So to restore all data at once after reinstall OS ?
This is very important thing, if I start to put a BTCPay server at work in production and the machine gets fucked, how easy is to restore it?
Please somebody can respond to these questions, not in a super technical manner so many others can understand it?
Maybe u/belcher_ and u/CardCollector1 or u/NicolasDorier can help with some answers here, please?
EDIT: I hope I don't have to add a meme to this post to bring more attention... seems that lately only memes are "important" here, subjects like this are ignored. EDIT2: 21 hours and still not any answer... fuck, nobody uses BTCPay ?
submitted by Mr--Robot to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Please help - why is my Bitcoin Conf file in the wrong directory?

I am running a Bitcoin Core GUI-based full node on Windows 10. The conf file is in my bitcoin data directory, instead of being in the appdata/roaming folder. But bitcoind and bitcoin-cli continue to look for the conf file in that appdata/roaming folder, which I guess is the reason the bitcoind server never appears to start. However, Bitcoin-qt (the GUI) appears to work fine and is also pointing to the conf file correctly. I checked by opening the conf file from the settings>options.

How do I start bitcoind and check if it is running or not? If I run it on cmd, it appears to start downloading the whole blockchain again, which is unnecessary because I already have all of it.
submitted by niranjanrao1 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Gridcoin Developer Update May 7th, 2018

Hello everyone and welcome to another Developer Update from the Gridcoin team. I'd like to remind everyone that these posts will be created every two weeks unless a wallet update is pending that week.
 
The last two weeks have largely been spent preparing for the next leisure release. The release would have come sooner, but some last minute additions to the staging branch were pulled in since the previous update post. Some of these pull requests have included:
 
Testnet has been working with PR #1060 which was mentioned in the last Developer Update post. I can now happily report that two superblocks have been successfully staked on testnet by Linux clients using contract forwarding. These results are extremely promising and will be a welcome addition for improved superblock stability on mainnet.
In the coming days I expect a new staging build to be ready for testnet deployment so testing will refocus soon on the PRs mentioned in this post.
 
While not entirely wallet related, I did want to point out some behind the scenes improvements for the https://gridcoin.us website. The site now properly redirects to HTTPS and supports TLS 1.2. Our site is now rated "A+" by SSL Labs. Thanks to our founder Rob for making these changes!
 
Thanks for reading this edition of the Developer Update. Expect to see another update two weeks from today (5/21), unless there is a wallet update released between now and then. If you have any comments or questions for the Gridcoin development team feel free to ask in the comments below. If I am not able to answer your question directly, I can certainly forward it to someone who can!
submitted by barton26 to gridcoin [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC network? Here is the steps to get a full node up and running in Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Easy UASF Node in Debian VM tutorial

So if you have a moderately powerful gaming desktop with a Quad-Core CPU like an i5 or better and 8+GB of RAM, you can easily run your own little UASF node in the background. Once it's done syncing with the network, you won't even notice it's there. Here's how.
You will need :
The following assumes you know how to install Linux in a Virtual Machine
Step I. - Installation. Go through expert install and set up a base system with only ssh server enabled. For partitioning, you can do just one big disk and everything in one partition, but if you happen to have a computer that has both SSD's and HDD's, it would be optimal to create two virtual disks and use a small one for the OS on the SSD and a larger one on the HDD in a custom mount point for the blockchain. Reboot and ssh into the server.
Step II. - Build requirements. A few things need to be taken care of. First, you'll want to edit the /etc/network/interfaces file and set up a static IP. Once that's done, stop by your router and make sure that traffic on port 8333 is forwarded to your debian VM. Then, install some packages we need :
apt update apt upgrade apt install build-essential autoconf libssl-dev libboost-dev libboost-chrono-dev libboost-filesystem-dev libboost-program-options-dev libboost-system-dev libboost-test-dev libboost-thread-dev libevent-dev git libtool pkg-config 
The next one is a bit more annoying. We need Berkeley DB 4.8, and it's a little old. It's packages are in the Debian Squeeze archives, so in the /etc/apt/sources.list file, we need to add :
deb http://archive.debian.org/debian/ squeeze main 
Then remember to update again, and install the thing :
apt install libdb4.8++-dev libdb4.8-dev 
If you intend to also throw on xorg and a UI, you will want Qt as well. Otherwise skip this last step.
install libqt4-dev libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libqrencode-dev 
Step III. - Build time
#Starting from /home/yourUser git clone https://github.com/UASF/bitcoin.git -b 0.14-BIP148 cd bitcoin ./autogen.sh ./configure make make install 
That's it! Well, mostly. Start it with
bitcoind -daemon -disablewallet -datadir=/whereveyou/want/youblockchain 
...and wait about thirty hours to sync with the network. You may want to visit the /whereveyou/want/youblockchain directory and create a permanent bitcoin.conf in there. To enable RPC calls to the server and get it to accept bitcoin-cli commands you'll want to use it to create a usepassword and copy that to your user's /.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf.
Minimal bitcoin.conf example
daemon=1 listen=1 disablewallet=1 server=1 rpcuser=bob rpcpassword=bob's password 
Security I recommend you disable password login and use private key authentication only on ssh, and also restrict iptables rules to the bare minimum that must be allowed for this application. You will need this in your iptables script :
# Allows BITCOIN traffic from anywhere -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 8333 -j ACCEPT # Allows RPC calls to the bitcoin server from localhost -A INPUT -p tcp -s 127.0.0.1 --dport 8332 -j ACCEPT 
Useful ressources :
submitted by the_bolshevik to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Really like the watch only functionality in bitcoin core!

First of all: thanks core developers for all the efforts!
Reason: if you run a full bitcoin node, to see your total balance without exposing your addresses to others.
Did it like this on my full node (ubuntu linux, no pruning):
Backup your wallet.dat
Start: bitcoind
Execute in a script (or on the command line):
bitcoin-cli importaddress "address1" Label false
bitcoin-cli importaddress "address2" Label false
bitcoin-cli importaddress "address3" Label false
Etc.
Stop: bitcoind
Start: bitcoin-qt -rescan
bitcoin-qt will rescan the wallet and you can see the progress. When finished you will see the balance of all addresses (watch and non watch)
When running bitcoind you can get the total balance of the wallet:
bitcoin-cli getbalance "*" 0 true
To get the total balance without the watch only addresses
bitcoin-cli getbalance "*" 0 false
Combine this with an Apache server and you can watch your balance completely safe anywhere and without exposing your (HD) addresses.
Side note: you can use bitcoin-qt as a wallet without too much hinder like this:
/usbin/taskset -c 0 /usbin/ionice -c 3 /usbin/nice -n 19 /home/usebitcoin-0.11.0/src/qt/bitcoin-qt
taskset: use only one cpu
ionice: low i/o priority
nice: low cpu priority
I hope this is useful for someone.
submitted by sumBTC to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The bitcoin-qt core wallet in pruned mode, cold storage and scaling: test results.

CONCLUSION
 
DETAILS
First a wallet was created in the following way:
bitcoin-qt -connect=wrong_ip_address -prune=550 -listen=0 -datadir=/home/use.bitcoin_pruned &
The trick here is to add a wrong ip address so bitcoin-qt won't start loading blocks. The -listen=0 makes it possible to run bitcoin-qt while bitcoind (as a full archival node) is running in the background on the same computer.
 
Now some "watch only" addresses, that already had some bitcoin in them, were added
(in bitcoin-qt: help -> Debug window -> Console)
importaddress watch_only_address "" false
The pruned blockchain was then created by inserting the correct ip address (pointing to my node) or by removing "-connect=ip_address" completely.
 
Because bitcoin-qt was not the only program, creating the pruned blockchain was a very long process that took about 5 days! I could speed up the process a lot by turning off bitcoind and running the pruned node as a bitcoind with some extra priority:
sudo /usbin/ionice -c 2 -n 0 /usbin/nice -n -20 ./bitcoind -datadir=/home/use.bitcoin_pruned/
Had I done that from the start, it could have been much faster and maybe 1 or 2 days would have been enough.
The final pruned blockchain has a size of: 2542 MB so about 2.5 GB.
 
I now moved the wallet.dat to wallet.dat_back and restarted bitcoin-qt. The program will create a new wallet that can be used to receive and then send transactions. If you now add a private key that already has some bitcoins in it, they will NOT be visible. There is no reason for that as the balances (not the history) are in the UTXO set.
 
I now started bitcoin-qt with the original wallet.dat file. The bitcoins in the watch only addresses are now visible. I then imported the private key of one of the addresses but the move of the bitcoins from "Watch only" to "Spendable" was not visible in bitcoin-qt. However, after a restart of bitcoin-qt the funds were visible in the "Spendable" section of the wallet. I then did a transaction to another address. Now in this case I want the change of the transaction to stay within MY "watch only" addresses and they shouldn't move to the (arbitrary) addresses created when the wallet was created. This is fortunate possible in bitcoin-qt. You have to choose in bitcoin-qt:
Settings -> Options -> Wallet -> Enable coin controle features.
It is then possible to choose the return address to be one of the watch only addresses (with or without bitcoins in them). It all worked just fine! It is not clear to me why bitcoin-qt has the option to "importprunedfunds", that doesn't seem necessary.
 
Of course, a big thank you to all developers who implemented the currently available great features.
submitted by sumBTC to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

REQUEST: Please help me fellas

So i've been playing around, in java (to build some crypto stuff, mainly something for myr) with the bitcoind/qt RPC making calls such as getinfo, getmininginfo, getblock (all of the btc RPC calls) and also have gotten the blocknotify/walletnotify working. However when i try the same methods with the myriadcoind/qt, with the same .conf file as the btc one, i don't get any response from the wallet or it's returning null Json objects? Is there something wrong with my .conf settings?

Enable RPC

server=1 rpcport=8333 rpcallowip=127.0.0.1 rpcuser=v rpcpassword=p 
edit: just to add im using http POST requests which bitcoins rpc responds to, maybe the myriad client doesn't respond to POST, only json rpc calls which would mean i would have to attempt a different kind of implementation?
edit2: i fixed it by chaning my .conf file to look like this
listen=1 rpcuser=v rpcpassword=p rpcport=8332 server=1 rpcallowip=192.168.0.0/24 
seems like the port might of been of since when i tried port 8333 with bitcoins qt it gave me an error.
submitted by illuminatiman to myriadcoin [link] [comments]

(1) Is it true that encrypting an *existing* bitcoin-qt wallet.dat file will "invalidate" any existing backups? (2) Can I use unicode characters - eg ♥ - in the bitcoin-qt wallet passphrase?

I have an existing bitcoin-qt wallet.dat file which I want to encrypt - using the command in the bitcoin-qt Settings menu, involving creating a passphrase.
I have 2 (possibly somewhat related) questions:
TL;DR
(1) If you encrypt an existing wallet.dat file, will the backups of the old wallet.dat file still work?
(2) Can you include unicode characters - eg ♥ - in the passphrase used to encrypt a bitcoin-qt wallet.dat file?
Worst-case scenario: The answers to (1) and (2) are both "no" - and I attempt to encrypt an existing wallet using unicode, and my backups no longer work (due to a new pool of addresses somehow being created?) and the passphrase isn't what I think it is (due to the unicode characters somehow being misinterpreted?) - and then I could lose all my coins??
Details
(1) The following (old, short) thread claims that after you encrypt an existing wallet, any previous backups of that wallet will no longer work:
https://pay.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1ccfdk/encrypting_walletdat_in_bitcoinqt/
Obviously, the the first response in that thread was slightly wrong, for saying that the "server" creates a new pool of 100 addresses to draw on. So using word "server" here was certainly incorrect - but maybe the gist of what they were saying might still be correct? (if you simply change "server" to "client").
I can actually understand that there might be reasons why encrypting a wallet.dat file could cause a new pool of 100 addresses to be generated.
But it does not make sense to me that this would make any older (unencrypted) backups instantly useless.
It seems to me that these older, unencrypted backups would still have their private keys intact, and could thus be used in certain (perhaps limited?) ways - such as:

(2) It seems that including a few unicode characters in the bitcoin-qt wallet passphrase would make it a lot stronger (since unicode is a much larger set of characters than ascii), so I would like to include a few.
But it would be more reassuring if it could be explicitly stated that this is indeed supported.

Possible catastrophic interaction between (1) and (2)?
If the answers to (1) and (2) were both "no" (ie, if you encrypt an existing bitcoin-qt wallet.dat file then any existing backups will not work, and unicode characters do not work in bitcoin-qt passphrases), then I'm worried there could be some kind of catastrophic interaction between (1) and (2) where I lose all my coins, as follows:
(1) I encrypt my existing wallet - making my old, unencrypted wallet.dat file now invalidated (due to something involving a new pool of addresses being generated?)
and
(2) I use a passphrase which includes unicode characters which bitcoin-qt appears to accept at the time of creation, but which doesn't work at the time of trying to decrypt the wallet.dat file (due to something going wring with how the supposed unicode characters are actually interpreted while being entered or copied-and-pasted?).
In this possible worst-case scenario, my old backups of wallet.dat no longer work, and my newly encrypted wallet.dat has some password which I'm not able to correctly enter anymore.
Sorry to be so paranoid about this!
Other remarks:
(a) I did do a (limited) test of unicode capability for bitcoin-qt wallet.dat passphrases: simply by creating a new (empty) wallet.dat file, and creating a passphrase for it involving unicode characters, and then attempting to change the passphrase (which requires entering the old passphrase that contained unicode characters).
This did seem to work ok: it let me re-enter the old passphrase (which included unicode characters) to create a new passphrase.
However, since this is an empty wallet (and since bitcoin-qt would ask for the passphrase only when attempting to actually spend from an encrypted wallet), I did not see a way to fully test whether the passphrase actually worked to decrypt a unicode-passphrase-encrypted wallet for the purpose of spending from it.
(I'm still downloading the rest of the blockchain and it's going to take at least another week on my slow connection, so don't see how I could send a small amount to the new wallet to test it either. My existing wallet.dat file was originally created on an internet-connected machine a long time ago, but it's been offline ever since, so in some sense it's kinda-sorta been in somewhat "cold" storage all this time, and I would prefer to avoid putting it online on a "hot" internet-connected machine until absolutely necessary.)
(b) Long-term, I am actually also in the process of setting up a proper cold storage system based on Armory, which I have installed on 2 Ubuntu machines (one offline and one online).
But I have a slow internet connection, and the backups of this old wallet.dat file have been sitting around unencrypted for ages (I've been relying simply on then being physically inaccessible).
Now some "things" are coming up over the next few days where I some better security right away, and it's probably going to take over a week for Armory/bitcoind to update my local copy of the blockchain.
So in the meantime, I also need some basic additional security right now - so encrypting the existing bitcoin-qt wallet.dat file using a strong passphrase (and making some new backups) seems like it could be a reasonable initial approach.
Thanks for any help!
submitted by encrypt_throwaway to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Colored coin client preview #1 (based on Bitcoin Armory)

I think it's already good enough for people to play with it. (Although certainly it's not ready for anything serious.)
For people who are not familiar with concept, colored coins is a technology which allows people to represent arbitrary tokens (e.g. issue private currencies, stocks, bonds, etc.) using small quantities of bitcoins. It is interesting because it would allow us to create decentralized and secure markets. (As decentralized and secure as Bitcoin itself, at least in theory.) See here.
Notes about current release:
Windows binaries: http://killerstorm.xen.prgmr.com/alex/ArmoryX-0.2.5.zip
There are no Linux binaries, but it's really easy to build it on Ubuntu or Debian:
(Note: if you're already using Armory, it is a good idea to hide you ~/.armory so it won't be seen by this experimental Armory mod. Or, perhaps, just don't run this experimental mod.)
Before you run it, make sure that bitcoind or Bitcoin-Qt is running and fully sync'ed. Armory takes up to 10 minutes to start (this version is slower because it additionally scans for colored transactions) and requires ~ 1 GB of RAM.
At start it will offer to create a wallet, do not enable encryption, otherwise issuing colored coins won't work.
Send some bitcoins to this new wallet, 0.02 BTC is probably enough to issue some colored coins and to pay for tx fees.
There is a drop down to choose color. Balance is displayed for a currently chosen color (i.e. if you chose TESTcc it will show how many TESTcc units this wallet owns), and when you send coins you send coins of that color.
Initially 'uncolored' is selected, it means normal BTC. This drop down also has TESTcc ("test colored coins") and "All colors" (this mode is just for debugging, you cannot send coins in this mode).
Here's what you can do now:
  1. Ask somebody to send you TESTcc. (We want to make it automatic, Satoshi Dice style, but unfortunately that code isn't quite ready.)
  2. Find and install other color definitions.
  3. Issue your own colored coins and send them to somebody who wants them. (LOL.)
Let's start from option #3. There is 'Hallucinate' menu. (It is called 'hallucinate' because colors do not exist on blockchain level, it is a client-side convention.) Choose 'Issue colored coins'. Likely all you need to change is name, but you can tweak satoshi-per-unit and number of units if you want.
When you click Issue it will create a new transaction (using your uncolored BTC) and will create a color definition. Optionally it will also upload your color definition to color definition registry. (This registry runs on my server, it might be down.)
You should note ColorID, this is how other people can refer to these coins (name is ambiguous).
You can now choose this new color in drop down and it will show your balance. (E.g. 1000 units.)
Now you'll perhaps want to send these coins to somebody. That person would need to install your color definition first. If you send colored coins without warning they might be lost, i.e. mixed with uncolored ones. For same reason it makes no sense to send them to wallet which isn't color aware.
For example, you can post on some forum:
I've issued LOLwut coins (ColorID: 36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54), each unit represents a bond with face value of 0.1 BTC payable by me, Trololo, via buy back. I promise to buy back all bonds in a month.
Now people who are interested in this LOLwut coin issue will copy ColorID, paste it into Hallucinate > Download color definition dialog, and if this color definition is published it will be downloaded and installed. Armory restart is required to complete installation.
After installation that person will be able to see these LOLwut coins.
Note that if you do not trust my registration server, you can publish color definition yourself: go to ~/.armory/colordefs, find 36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54.colordef and upload it to your web server. Then you can give people URL like http://example.com/36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54.colordef and they can download it by URL.
Or they can just obtain this file by any means and copy it to ~/.armory/colordefs directory. It is decentralized, nobody can prevent you from issuing colored coins.
I think that's all. There is also Hallucinate > Manage color definitions dialog, but I hope it's easy to figure out how it works.
We are working on improved version, particularly on p2p exchange feature.
I've set up an IRC channel for people to talk about trying out colored coins: #colored-coins-otc on Freenode.
submitted by killerstorm to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Blackcoin Wallet Passphrase mistyped - Bruteforce

Summary: I executed a (limited!) brute force attack on a wallet where I mistyped the passphrase. Attached is a short tutorial how to make it.
Long story: some months ago I created a wallet. I keyed in my passphrase with 70 characters long (yes it is long), wrote it down, bought Blackcoin. Next day I tried to open it, but it seems to be that I mistyped (two times) the passphrase. So I started to make a long research how to "hack" it. I finally figured that I can make a limited brute force attack by using RPC. So, I got familiar with curl (RPC tool) and created a batch-script with Excel where I just changed one character per try. I ended with 5200 tries.
And boom: It worked! It was try number 2814 which worked. So, I really just mistyped one single character. The wallet has been opened once again. So now I have access to my Blackcoins.
-----TUTORIAL-----
I was using the old blackcoin-qt (on windows) because the wallet was created with this one. I do not know if it is compatible with lore. Situation is that you remember (more or less) the passphrase, but you think that you just mistyped one character. Idea is to make a limited brute force attack on the wallet - so, to test different passphrase which are similar to your remembered one.
we will create a script (batch) which calls the blackcoin-qt (as server) via RPC and try to open the wallet with different passphrases.
What did not work
I found some hints concerning hashcat and bitcoin2john (also for Blackcoin), which enable you to retrieve the seed out of the wallet and to make a bruteforce on the hash of the seed (with hashcat). But it did not work, because the blackcoin wallet seems to be different than the bitcoin wallet.
There is also no direct commandline parameter for opening the wallet with passphrase. So I started to work with RPC.
Using the blackcoin-qt as a server
Switch into C:\Users\myusername\AppData\Roaming\BlackCoin and place a blackcoin.conf file here. This should contain (at least) these entries:

server=1 tells BlackCoin to accept JSON-RPC commands.

server=1

You must set rpcuser and rpcpassword to secure the JSON-RPC api

rpcuser=user
rpcpassword=password

Listen for RPC connections on this TCP port:

rpcport=15715

You can use BlackCoin or blackcoind to send commands to Bitcoin/bitcoindBlackCoin/blackcoind

running on another host using this option:

rpcconnect=127.0.0.1
...Start blackcoin from the commandline with the server parameter like this: blackcoin-qt -server=1
Test RPC Calls with curl
Download curl (an RPC tool for the commandline): https://curl.haxx.se/
For this test you should use a new generated wallet with a password you know.
First test with the getinfo method, which shows you if the connection to the Blackcoin Daemon is established: curl --header "Content-Type: application/json" --data-binary "{\"jsonrpc\":\"1.0\",\"id\":\"curltest\",\"method\":\"getinfo\",\"params\":[]}" http://user:[email protected]:15715/
If you do not get any connection, you can also use netstat -a to see if your machine is listening on the port 15715.
Finally, the method to open the wallet via RPC (uses two parameters) curl --header "Content-Type: application/json" --data-binary "{\"jsonrpc\":\"1.0\",\"id\":\"curltest\",\"method\":\"walletpassphrase\",\"params\":[\"mySecretWalletPassword\",50]}" http://user:[email protected]:15715/
Note the output you get, when you use the correct password: {"result":null,"error":null,"id":"curltest"}
Later we want to search in a logfile for the expression "error":null in order to identify the correct password
Generating the Bruteforce Script
I used an Excel file to create a script. On the basis of the so-far-remembered-passphrase and a selection of possible characters this scripts changes for each row only one character. I ended up with roughly 5000 rows, but I used a very long passphrase (70 characters). Using the Excel output you can create a script out of it.
If you are interested in the Excel file you can contact me on bitcointalk - my username is "Euro1000"
Execution
Start the script (batch) and pipe the output into a log: myScript.bat > log.txt
When the batch finished search for the expression "error":null If you found it, you found the password in the line above the expression.
Limitations
I used the old blackcoin-qt (not Lore), because the wallet has been generated with blackcoin-qt. Lore should use the same RPC implementation, but it is untested if this tutorial also works with Lore.
I used this on Windows I do not know if this will also work on Linux.
Some special characters are a little bit tricky in curl, because some of them like "<" let curl crashes. Perhaps you can escape these special characters somehow.
submitted by coindestroyer to blackcoin [link] [comments]

How to put a full node on a VM to good use?

I've got a full Core node up and running on a VM (hosted with the bitcoin-accepting Vultr.com) and I'd like to put it to use in a way that helps strengthen the network. I've heard that a full node isn't very useful unless you're using it to send and receive transactions. But I'm having a hard time accomplishing that in any meaningful way.
Ideally, I'd like an Android or desktop wallet that would connect to the node and use it to process transactions. Any suggestions?
Things I've examined so far:
submitted by mshadel to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Keep your Bitcoin Core UASF node up to date

Note to folks with a fake uacomment: that neither helps nor works. Upgrade to BIP148!
Those who want to use BIP148 have two main choices: UASF BIP148 and Bitcoin Knots. The first has bip148 enabled by default. The second follows a PR originally proposed to Bitcoin Core (and rejected) which adds bip148=0 (option, disabled by default) so it needs to be enabled in configuration file or at runtime.
Make a backup of your wallet.dat, just in case.

Bitcoin Core SegWit UASF BIP148

This is the "original" BIP148 version.
1) Get the source at https://github.com/UASF/bitcoin/releases.
Current release: v1.0 - https://github.com/UASF/bitcoin/releases/tag/v0.14.2-uasfsegwit1.0
As a reminder, your install options are as follows:
a) Binaries: Bitcoin Core v0.14.2-based UASF SegWit BIP148 can be downloaded here (decompress and then run desired binary (bitcoind for daemon/server, bitcoin-cli for the CLI, etc.) which you can find in bin subdirectory; there's also a PPA for Ubuntu users who prefer apt-get install).
b) Source: get the source at the URL at the top. Build as usual, following official Bitcoin Core instructions.
To install, stop and (if you want) remove existing Bitcoin Core. Then install and run Bitcoin SegWit UASF BIP148. Windows users who use installer (filenames that end with *setup-unsigned.exe) should first uninstall existing Bitcoin Core before they install this version.
How to verify binaries (signatures):
https://np.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/6c5zw3/howto_verify_the_signed_uasf_released_binaries/
You can also verify checksums by importing Luke's PGP key and ensuring checksums in SHA256SUMS.asc(example here) match those of the downloaded file(s).

Bitcoin Knots

This is Luke-Jr's Bitcoin release with many enhancements and a BIP148 option. You can find more at https://bitcoinknots.org.
Get it at bitcoinknots.org. Install procedure for binaries is the same as for UASF BIP148 binaries, but with one added step:
Windows users who use installer (filenames that end with *setup-unsigned.exe) need to first uninstall existing Bitcoin Core before they can install this version.
If you want to build from the source, refer to Bitcoin Knots documentation (because it has a number of different options compared to Bitcoin Core).
How to verify binaries (signatures): download and import Luke's PGP key, refresh PGP keys, then verify the signed checksums file corresponds to the checksum of the binary you downloaded for your system.

Updating installed binaries

If you're updating either UASF BIP148 or Knots binaries (which you downloaded as zip or tgz file and decompressed to your disk), stop Bitcoin, decompress newer binaries over old binaries, then start service again. You can also move old binaries and then deploy the latest binaries.

Reverting to Bitcoin Core

Before chain split

Prior to chain split (such as before Aug 1), you can "go back" by simply removing BIP148 or Knots and installing Bitcoin Core 0.14.2. You can't go back to an earlier release such as 0.12 (same behavior as with Bitcoin Core).
Starting with UASF BIP148 v1.0, however, there's less need to be concerned about going back to Bitcoin Core - as mentioned above, Bitcoin Core 0.14.2 behavior can be achieved by restarting UASF BIP148 v1.0 or Bitcoin Knots with bitp148=0.
Should you want to remove UASF BIP148-compatible and run Bitcoin Core 0.14.2, you can do this:
Then install Bitcoin Core 0.14.2.

In the case of a chain split

Please remember to pay special attention to wallet.dat if you use one. This section only deals with the change of the binary and blockchain rewind, and not coin splitting and wallet backups.
If chains splits on or after August 1st, you would have to rewind the blockchain in order to use a different Bitcoin release on another chain. Details will vary depending on the circumstances (for example, we can't know in advance which chains will exist.)
UASF BIP148 v1.0 (not older releases) makes it possible to set bip148=0 and restart which automatically rewinds the blockchain to be consistent with Core. If you wanted to change to Bitcoin Core, you could first restart UASF BIP148 or Knots with bip148=0 to rewind the blockchain, then uninstall the binaries and install Bitcoin Core.
If a chain split happens, check UASFGuide.com or this subreddit for specific details.

Be back in late July!

In the second half of July, check for updates on a weekly basis. There may be further updates or improvements.

Changelog

2017-07-12 - reminder to pay attention to wallet backup in case of changing the binaries or startup options after a chain split
2017-07-11 - download links updated for v1.0, added about auto-rewind in v1.0, other small edits
Edit: this post may be updated prior to August 1st.
submitted by eustan to UASF [link] [comments]

Colored coins: NGCCC preview build v0.0.2

Binaries:
(my pubkey)
This build fixes several bugs and make it easier to share asset definitions: it is now possible to copy the whole thing in JSON format.
Wallet is in testnet mode by default. (And I strongly recommend against using it in mainnet mode, even though it is possible.)
Use either gui (ngccc-gui) or command-line interface (ngccc-cli --help).
It requires bitcoind/bitcoin-qt in testnet mode running locally. To install it:
  1. Download bitcoin-qt from http://bitcoin.org
  2. Create bitcoin.conf with rpcuser and rpcpassword
  3. Run it like bitcoin-qt -server -testnet -txindex
submitted by killerstorm to coloredcoin [link] [comments]

Uniwallet, a wallet for a of your altcoins :)

*Uniwallet, a wallet for all of your altcoins, sorry for the mistake
TL;DR: A wallet for all of your altcoins, working with a system of plugins and automatic updates. See bottom link for official thread.
**
More and more altcoins are being made. It's getting confusing on your computer if you - like me - have many different cryptocurrencies wallets installed. Keeping track of your transactions, account balance and many other things between your Bitcoins, Litecoins, Dogecoins, *Coin wallets is getting tiring and messy. It also goes without saying that downloading the whole blockchain each time you want to try new coins is unacceptable, with its size growing more and more each day. Your time is valuable and wasting it by waiting a whole day before using your wallet is intolerable, I think you will agree with me on this one.
Uniwallet solves all of these problems.
**

What is Uniwallet?

Uniwallet is a frontend application currently in developpement that will allow you to manage from one simple interface all of your bitcoins and altcoins transactions, addresses, etc.. Designed to be simple with functions like automatic subwallet update detection (and installation upon confirmation), it will be extremely secure and rely directly on the *coind programs and secure server connexion (see the section below). If you trust your Qt wallet, then you trust Uniwallet, since they use the same software for transactions. Also, as I said, a system of plugins is implemented. That means that anybody who wants to see their coins supported by Uniwallet can just write a plugin for it, which should be easy.
**

How does it works?

Two methods of operation are available, server-side and client-side. Your wallet files are always stored on your computer in specific directories, regardless of which operation mode you choose. A plugin system for adding subwallets to Uniwallet ensure that it's easy to use new currencies, and blockchains are downloaded from the server directly to your wallets if it is your desire (negates the wait time, makes "plug-and-play" wallets).
>Server-side operation: Transaction softwares (bitcoind, litecoind, *coind) are on a remote server and their use is shared amongst all Uniwallet users. Transactions are made using the Raw Transactions API coupled with RPC, and a secure connexion to the server is used to protect any data. Security is a priority!
>Client-side operation: You specify where on your computer transaction softwares (bitcoind, litecoind, *coind) are located, and everything related to your transactions is handled localy (without a remote server).
**
Of course, this project is still in its early phase and many things may change with time. Here's the official thread on the bitcointalk forums, and here is the thread that started it all on a lonely Dec. 30. :)
If you are interested in investing, tell me! I may put up donation addresses or a kickstarter.
submitted by MisterGuacamole to dogecoin [link] [comments]

BitContracts.org bounties

BitContracts.org is ready to award 10 BTC in bounties to project(s) which make use of advanced Bitcoin features. (Such as use of multi-signature transactions, other unusual ways of making transactions, etc. As of particular uses, check posts to this subreddit.)
It works this way: if you want to implement something cool, submit your proposal (reply to this thread). I will consider all proposals and select worthy ones, they will get funding. Say, if I see two worthy proposals each might get 5 BTC bounty upon completion.
I recommend trying to make a demo of some interesting feature. Implementation quality does not matter much, it's only important to demonstrate how it can work (of course, it should use tech correctly, faking it isn't OK).
Recommended platform:
  1. Electrum (Python, thin client, standalone)
  2. guts of Electrum (you can rip transaction-handling part out of it)
  3. script which uses bitcoind API
But other platforms are OK too. MultiBit, Armory, Bitcoin-Qt, etc.
Criteria: It should be an improvement over existing state. Say, it's already to possible to create multi-signature-using transactions and whatnot using bitcoind raw transaction command line interface (see examples), or via friendlier txtool. (Which is a good example of using bitcoind API from JS.)
I think friendlier user interface requires some communications between clients. E.g. merchant might upload tx details to some sort of messaging server and give customer a link, then customer's client can negotiate tx details through messaging.
Assistance: I will provide assistance in form of advice and whatnot, but, of course, people need to know what they doing, which requires some knowledge of Bitcoin protocol.
How to apply: I want to know
Goal: I want to continue development of perspective tools as part of BitContracts.org effort. I plan to get more funding for it, but it's not guaranteed.
And while we are at it, I'm looking for JS and Python developers to work on colored coins clients. This is unrelated to these bounties though, it's on a different budget, potentially much more money.
submitted by killerstorm to BitcoinDevBounties [link] [comments]

Programming Bitcoin-qt using the RPC api (1 of 6) HOW TO BUY BITCOIN 2020 - BEST Ways to Invest In ... JSON RPC Calls with Bitcoin qt (4 of 6) 9. bitcoind Whats the difference between bitcoind and btcd?

Bitcoin Core ist ein gemeinschaftliches, freies Software-Projekt, veröffentlicht unter der MIT-Lizenz. Release-Signaturen überprüfen Download über Torrent Quelltext Versionshistorie anzeigen. Bitcoin Core Release Signierschlüssel v0.8.6 - 0.9.2.1 v0.9.3 - 0.10.2 v0.11.0+ Oder wählen Sie Ihr Betriebssystem . Windows exe - zip. Mac OS X dmg - tar.gz. Linux (tgz) 64 bit. ARM Linux 64 bit ... ./bitcoin-qt Command-line arguments . These commands are accurate as of Bitcoin Core version v0.14.0. Command Description -? Print this help message and exit -version : Print version and exit -alertnotify=<cmd> Execute command when a relevant alert is received or we see a really long fork (%s in cmd is replaced by message) -blocknotify=<cmd> Execute command when the best block changes (%s in ... Install Bitcoin-Qt Since version 0.9, Bitcoin-Qt was renamed to Bitcoin Core t o reduce confusion between Bitcoin-the-network and Bitcoin-the-software. Bitcoin Core is a full Bitcoin client. It is a thick client, meaning it requires the full blockchain (explained below) on local disk to operate and expose blockchain back to the network to help relay and verify transactions. Keep a copy (sync ... Bitcoin software has both a graphical interface called bitcoin-qt and a console interface, bitcoind. If the first is convenient for human use, then without a text it is quite difficult to make an online store or any other service that accepts bitcoins as a payment. About it and speech will go. To work you need to run one instance of bitcoin as a daemon, so he worked as a full-fledged host on ... Bitcoin Core is a community-driven free software project, released under the MIT license. Verify release signatures Download torrent Source code Show version history. Bitcoin Core Release Signing Keys v0.8.6 - 0.9.2.1 v0.9.3 - 0.10.2 v0.11.0+ Or choose your operating system. Windows exe - zip. Mac OS X dmg - tar.gz. Linux (tgz) 64 bit. ARM Linux 64 bit - 32 bit. Linux (Snap Store) Support ...

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Programming Bitcoin-qt using the RPC api (1 of 6)

HOW TO BUY BITCOIN 2020 - BEST Ways to Invest In Cryptocurrency For Beginners! (UPDATE) Get $10 of free Bitcoin when you buy or sell at least $100 of cryptoc... How to run Bitcoin-qt as a server with a configuration file (3 of 6) How to run Bitcoin-qt as a server with a configuration file (3 of 6) - Duration: 5:48. Lars Holdgaard 10,982 views. 5:48. Communicate with Bitcoin-qt using C# - .NET (5 of 6) - Duration: 6:43. ... How to run Bitcoin-qt as a server with a configuration file (3 of 6) - Duration: 5:48. Lars Holdgaard 11,060 views. 5:48 . How To Build Raw Bitcoin Transactions in NodeJS - Duration: 16:57 ... Bitcoind is the 'official' satoshi bitcoin server. Bitcoind has been in development for six years (at the time of this video). Btcd is an alternative server to the official distribution that is ...

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